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Monte Martin 2021-07-12
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Hardware is hard. You can browse the archives of this site and come up with dozens of bold attempts to make new consumer electronics gadgets work — some of them very close to home. But, like all startups, most hardware companies run into the hard-core grind of turning atoms into something worth buying.  To commemorate […]
collect
0
Monte Martin 2021-03-22
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You’re reading The Waugh Zone, our daily politics briefing. Sign up now to get it by email in the evening.

Sanctions work. Or at least they do when it comes to defusing a Tory backbench rebellion over China. That’s the lingering suspicion after the government won a tight vote on an amendment to the Trade Bill tonight, with a narrow majority of 18.

The rebels’ proposal, to impose tighter parliamentary judicial oversight on trade deals with nations deemed to have committed genocide, was aimed squarely at Beijing. Some 27 backbenchers, including former foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt, backed the plan despite hours of pressure from the whips.

Yet a close look at the voting lists shows that the government’s majority was exactly the same as the number of Tory MPs (18) who didn’t vote either way. I understand there were in fact around 13 Tory active abstainers. If a big chunk of them could have been persuaded to go the whole way, Boris Johson would have seen his majority wiped out.

And for those waverers, it’s not outlandish to think their decision not to rebel was swayed by an eleventh hour decision by Dominic Raab to slap sanctions on key senior Chinese officials involved in the mass internment of Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang province. What made the vote so tight was Labour and other parties pushing hard for tougher action.

Now, it’s worth pointing out, as Raab did, that the whole of the EU had also today slapped sanctions on the officials (following the lead of the US and Canada). Labour claimed the UK had waited for Brussels to act first, while Raab countered that it was wrong to suggest “the concerted and unprecedented action of 30 countries is somehow tied up with the UK’s domestic legislative timetable” on the Trade Bill.

Yet the timing of the sanctions, and the way they allowed the foreign secretary to denounce Beijing, certainly didn’t harm the whips’ case that rebelling was a step too far. Some key China hawks like Tom Tugendhat (who had wondered why Raab didn’t use the word “genocide” today) didn’t vote against the rebel amendment – but they didn’t vote for it either.

Of course, one of the reasons that Raab’s words about European-level human rights and trade caught fire last week was precisely because they came off the back of an Integrated Review that several Tory backbenchers felt pulled its punches on China. While the foreign secretary had said that he would never want a free trade deal with nations that were “beyond the pale”, it was the idea of him enlarging the perimeter of that moral fence based on “growth markets of the future” that sparked concern.

And despite the tougher words against Beijing today, those fears had already been heightened earlier this month when the Times reported Raab’s words at a Conservative Friends of the Chinese event alongside the Chinese deputy ambassador to London. “We want to trade with our Chinese friends,” he said. If there was more respect for “international obligations that the Chinese government has signed up to...there’s no reason to think that we couldn’t deepen our trading relationship”, even with a free-trade agreement one day.

Brexit is one big driver behind the need to cut more trade deals. That said, EU countries like Germany have long focused on trade with Beijing as a priority, while claiming that human rights are also important. And that difficult balance was underlined by both Theresa May and Philip Hammond in evidence to the National Security Strategy Committee on Monday.

May’s most waspish words were reserved for Gavin Williamson and his alleged leak activities undermining the National Security Committee. Even this security-conscious former PM, who approved Chinese investment in Hinkley Point and granted a limited role for Huawei in our 5G network, didn’t waver from her belief that the UK could not “shut China out”. 

But it was Hammond who was perhaps the boldest, hinting that trade with Beijing was not just desirable but almost inevitable. The ex-chancellor even suggested there was too much naive “optimism” in “assuming that the Chinese will allow us, as it were, an à la carte approach to the menu of relationships” on trade and human rights.

That sounded bluntly like either we pick trade or human rights, as increasingly Beijing won’t let us “balance” both. And Hammond speaks for a sizeable number of Tories who quietly think trade is the priority. (Note that even ex-Lib Dem leader Vince Cable told the New Statesman podcast this week the UK shouldn’t meddle in China’s territorial backyard). With the UK hosting the global climate talks this year, Boris Johnson also needs the Chinese to help him get an historic breakthrough on the environment.

Hammond put his finger on the real problem, which is that the West has never before dealt with an enemy (although he used the diplospeak of “strategic challengers”) that had different values but had similar economic strength. “We’ve been rather used to dealing with strategic challengers that are economically inferior to us [aka Russia]. This is going to require a wholly different way of thinking”. After the government’s narrow win tonight, that thinking is still unclear.

collect
0
Monte Martin 2021-02-24
img
That figure is likely to cause more than a few spit takes among Jeepers.
collect
0
Monte Martin 2020-12-18
img
Only 0.5% of the medical residents at Stanford are in on the first round of shots.
collect
0
Monte Martin 2021-06-25
img

I'm not the robot, pal, you are

Something for the Weekend, Sir?  I have failed the Turing test – again. Apparently I am unable to exhibit intelligent behaviour equivalent to that of a human being.…

collect
0
Monte Martin 2021-03-20
img
The Xe HPG chip is the first PC gaming chip coming from Intel. The company has already tied up with Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) to make these chips
collect
0
Monte Martin 2021-01-22
img
The Wynn Las Vegas is a high-end resort right on The Strip that features a casino, spa, restaurants, theaters, and impressive new COVID-19 protocols.
collect
0
Monte Martin 2020-11-30
img

You can’t judge a book by its cover. You can judge it based on peer recommendations. Here are 67 picks for a great bookcase to improve your content marketing, expand your marketing prowess, and gain inspiration. Continue reading

The post 67 Book Picks for the Ultimate Content Marketing Library appeared first on Content Marketing Institute.

collect
0
Monte Martin 2021-04-23
img
The genre has long relied on racial and gender stereotypes. Recent strides in diversity have made it better (and more fun) to choose your fighter.
collect
0
Monte Martin 2021-03-15
img
Cuomo faces widespread division within his party, with 13 prominent Dems - including Sens. Schumer and Gillibrand - calling for him to resign.
collect
0
Monte Martin 2020-12-25
img
Yesterday we brought you the most popular stories of 2020. These are the most talked-about.
collect
0
Monte Martin 2020-11-19
img

Learn the main ingredients you need to balance when implementing the Objective and Key Results (OKRs) framework for your SEO agency.

The post How to Drive Growth for Your Agency with the OKRs Framework via @seomonitor appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

collect
0
Monte Martin 2021-04-20
img

Maybe I should have stopped after I uncovered my mother’s old artist’s portfolio, leaning against a half-wall covered in cobwebs. I gently thumbed through the contents: a stencil of well-worn cowboy boots, a sketch of the dinner bell from my childhood, a charcoal portrait of a naked man. With a moustache. Dad?! I was hoping to find heirlooms, not my dad’s youthful and anatomically correct body.

But I had my reasons for being up there in the first place.

Maskless Covidiots in my apartment building in New York forced me to flee to my parents’ house an hour north of the city. So while they were golfing and sipping cocktails in Florida, I was pacing their suburban home in the woods, panicked and convinced they were as good as dead.

“You’re never going to die” was my whimsical response to my parents (now in their late 70s) whenever the subject came up. I was able to hold denial and the inevitable simultaneously ― until the pandemic body-slammed me with reality, that is. When I allow myself to reflect on this at all, my fantasy is that my parents go out together, because otherwise it would betoo devastating for the one who got left behind. Also, Ican’t imagine planning two separate shivas.

Whether it’s my dad’s hearing loss or my mom’s dicey driving, watching them age is sobering ― and probably more so for them. But I’m fortunate. We have a tight bond, and our love for individual therapy has encouraged honest communication. Nothing is left unsaid. They know where they failed me as parents, and once a year, I apologise for being a colossal bitch during my divorce.

Like many people sheltering at home, I couldn’t do much of anything other than sanitising heavily trafficked countertops and door handles. After two days, it hit me. Traffic? I’m the only one here. Marking my days with mundane tasks, like replacing the toilet seat covers with slow-close lids and dumping food with expiration dates earlier than December 2019, wasn’t distracting me from my dread.

Decluttering and tidying my parents’ attic was a preemptive strike, designed to mitigate the trauma of touching their belongings after their death, when I’d be grieving and inconsolable. My throat tightened just thinking about it. I didn’t ask my parents for permission beforehand because I was afraid of being denied. Also, I didn’t want them to know I was considering their demise.

I sat on my camp trunk and FaceTimed my mom. “Hey, I’m cleaning out the attic for you. Can I ditch the busted laundry baskets? How about the defective suitcases and ripped window screens? Fine,” I sighed. “What about donating the Norelco hair dryer?” When I was little, my mom would sometimes set my hair in big fat rollers after taking a bath and then sit me under the dryer like we were at a salon. It made me feel glamorous.

Boxes of slide carousels stood balanced in the middle of the room, like a game of Jenga. Slideshows were hugely popular during family gatherings growing up. I pulled a few out and held them up to the light. My brother and I are spinning in a teacup at Disney World. Dad and I are practicing free throws in the driveway. My mom is presenting a can of walnuts to the camera. I stacked the boxes at the door, excited to digitise them once it was safe to be in the world again.

That’s when I came across Mom’s portfolio of drawings, including Dad in all his naked glory. Undeterred, I shrugged it off in the name of abstract art and moved on. 

Alongside a commercial coffee urn was an old reel-to-reel film projector. As a filmmaker, I wondered why they hadn’t entrusted it to me instead of letting it rust. I opened a crushed box beside the projector. Metal canisters of 8mm film spilled out of a ripped shopping bag. Red spools of exposed film were unraveling, and I rewound them. Wow, I thought, I’ve got to digitise these home movies as well. 

A few questions come to mind when you find peeling porn labels written in your dad’s chicken scratch: Two Lesbians-artful, Bath scene-great ending, Two guys kissing-very good. Questions like: When was the last screening? Was I in my bedroom studying geometry at the time?

It would have been easier to write off if it were just a few reels, but the sheer volume looked like my parents might’ve owned a retail store, and that was weird.

I reflexively started rocking back and forth, davening between intrigue and nausea. Here I was, alone with their porn, while they were probably aqua-jogging in Florida wearing face shields. I had no context. I darted from the room, tripping over a straw sombrero. 

Intellectually, I know my parents are human beings with desires; good for them. But did I have to find those desires? Why aren’t they in a safe that I don’t have the combination to? My parents weren’t big on setting boundaries when I was growing up, so I set them for myself. I didn’t want equal footing ― they weren’t my friends. And I was uninterested in the intimate details of their past.

My phone rang. It was my mom.

I tried to decide whether to tell her what I’d found. Would it enrich our lives? Change how I felt about them? My head is teeming with important information from them: ancestral history, holiday traditions and Borscht Belt comedy. I know where my dad keeps the wills, the health directives and the list of those uninvited to the funeral. What more do I need to know?

But I did tell her. 

She was matter-of-fact. “When you open Pandora’s box, you never know what you’re gonna find.” She paused. “You’re a little late to the party. Your brother found the box decades ago. Oh, and Dad said to leave his stuff. He’ll go through it when we get home.” 

I hung up the phone and laughed. My mom’s nonchalant attitude had helped me to put things into perspective. Her breezy tone made me consider the possibility that my discomfort was my burden alone, and that perhaps my disgust was an overreaction. 

All of these years later, even as a grown-up (allegedly), I was still setting boundaries, thinking that my parents (and I) needed protection from potential embarrassment. I was letting my child-self dictate the woman that I am today.

My unease evaporated, as if I were evolving right there in the laundry room of their house. I didn’t care about my parents’ stash. I cared that I had them around to laugh with. 

It was selfish to rummage through my parents’ things. Finding their mementos spoke to their curiosity, spirit and youth, giving me a deeper understanding of who they are as people.

I’m not entirely over my hang-ups, but I do feel closer to them. I still wish it hadn’t happened, but maybe it’s time I let go of some of my strident ideas and embrace my parents (and their smut) for who they are. For as long as I’m able to. 

This article first appeared on HuffPost Personal

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

collect
0
Monte Martin 2021-03-09
img
Upcoming changes to the way the Ethereum network operates will render mining GPUs effectively redundant.
collect
0
Monte Martin 2020-12-22
img
Porsche designed the 992 around the PDK gearbox; why is the manual so darn good?
collect
0
Monte Martin 2020-09-30
img
(Cell Press) Researchers at Columbia University have developed AwareDX--Analysing Women At Risk for Experiencing Drug toXicity--a machine learning algorithm that identifies and predicts differences in adverse drug effects between men and women by analyzing 50 years' worth of reports in an FDA database. The algorithm, described September 22 in the journal Patterns, automatically corrects for the biases in these data that stem from an overrepresentation of male subjects in clinical research trials.
collect
0
Monte Martin 2021-07-12
img
Hardware is hard. You can browse the archives of this site and come up with dozens of bold attempts to make new consumer electronics gadgets work — some of them very close to home. But, like all startups, most hardware companies run into the hard-core grind of turning atoms into something worth buying.  To commemorate […]
Monte Martin 2021-04-23
img
The genre has long relied on racial and gender stereotypes. Recent strides in diversity have made it better (and more fun) to choose your fighter.
Monte Martin 2021-03-22
img

You’re reading The Waugh Zone, our daily politics briefing. Sign up now to get it by email in the evening.

Sanctions work. Or at least they do when it comes to defusing a Tory backbench rebellion over China. That’s the lingering suspicion after the government won a tight vote on an amendment to the Trade Bill tonight, with a narrow majority of 18.

The rebels’ proposal, to impose tighter parliamentary judicial oversight on trade deals with nations deemed to have committed genocide, was aimed squarely at Beijing. Some 27 backbenchers, including former foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt, backed the plan despite hours of pressure from the whips.

Yet a close look at the voting lists shows that the government’s majority was exactly the same as the number of Tory MPs (18) who didn’t vote either way. I understand there were in fact around 13 Tory active abstainers. If a big chunk of them could have been persuaded to go the whole way, Boris Johson would have seen his majority wiped out.

And for those waverers, it’s not outlandish to think their decision not to rebel was swayed by an eleventh hour decision by Dominic Raab to slap sanctions on key senior Chinese officials involved in the mass internment of Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang province. What made the vote so tight was Labour and other parties pushing hard for tougher action.

Now, it’s worth pointing out, as Raab did, that the whole of the EU had also today slapped sanctions on the officials (following the lead of the US and Canada). Labour claimed the UK had waited for Brussels to act first, while Raab countered that it was wrong to suggest “the concerted and unprecedented action of 30 countries is somehow tied up with the UK’s domestic legislative timetable” on the Trade Bill.

Yet the timing of the sanctions, and the way they allowed the foreign secretary to denounce Beijing, certainly didn’t harm the whips’ case that rebelling was a step too far. Some key China hawks like Tom Tugendhat (who had wondered why Raab didn’t use the word “genocide” today) didn’t vote against the rebel amendment – but they didn’t vote for it either.

Of course, one of the reasons that Raab’s words about European-level human rights and trade caught fire last week was precisely because they came off the back of an Integrated Review that several Tory backbenchers felt pulled its punches on China. While the foreign secretary had said that he would never want a free trade deal with nations that were “beyond the pale”, it was the idea of him enlarging the perimeter of that moral fence based on “growth markets of the future” that sparked concern.

And despite the tougher words against Beijing today, those fears had already been heightened earlier this month when the Times reported Raab’s words at a Conservative Friends of the Chinese event alongside the Chinese deputy ambassador to London. “We want to trade with our Chinese friends,” he said. If there was more respect for “international obligations that the Chinese government has signed up to...there’s no reason to think that we couldn’t deepen our trading relationship”, even with a free-trade agreement one day.

Brexit is one big driver behind the need to cut more trade deals. That said, EU countries like Germany have long focused on trade with Beijing as a priority, while claiming that human rights are also important. And that difficult balance was underlined by both Theresa May and Philip Hammond in evidence to the National Security Strategy Committee on Monday.

May’s most waspish words were reserved for Gavin Williamson and his alleged leak activities undermining the National Security Committee. Even this security-conscious former PM, who approved Chinese investment in Hinkley Point and granted a limited role for Huawei in our 5G network, didn’t waver from her belief that the UK could not “shut China out”. 

But it was Hammond who was perhaps the boldest, hinting that trade with Beijing was not just desirable but almost inevitable. The ex-chancellor even suggested there was too much naive “optimism” in “assuming that the Chinese will allow us, as it were, an à la carte approach to the menu of relationships” on trade and human rights.

That sounded bluntly like either we pick trade or human rights, as increasingly Beijing won’t let us “balance” both. And Hammond speaks for a sizeable number of Tories who quietly think trade is the priority. (Note that even ex-Lib Dem leader Vince Cable told the New Statesman podcast this week the UK shouldn’t meddle in China’s territorial backyard). With the UK hosting the global climate talks this year, Boris Johnson also needs the Chinese to help him get an historic breakthrough on the environment.

Hammond put his finger on the real problem, which is that the West has never before dealt with an enemy (although he used the diplospeak of “strategic challengers”) that had different values but had similar economic strength. “We’ve been rather used to dealing with strategic challengers that are economically inferior to us [aka Russia]. This is going to require a wholly different way of thinking”. After the government’s narrow win tonight, that thinking is still unclear.

Monte Martin 2021-03-15
img
Cuomo faces widespread division within his party, with 13 prominent Dems - including Sens. Schumer and Gillibrand - calling for him to resign.
Monte Martin 2021-02-24
img
That figure is likely to cause more than a few spit takes among Jeepers.
Monte Martin 2020-12-25
img
Yesterday we brought you the most popular stories of 2020. These are the most talked-about.
Monte Martin 2020-12-18
img
Only 0.5% of the medical residents at Stanford are in on the first round of shots.
Monte Martin 2020-11-19
img

Learn the main ingredients you need to balance when implementing the Objective and Key Results (OKRs) framework for your SEO agency.

The post How to Drive Growth for Your Agency with the OKRs Framework via @seomonitor appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

Monte Martin 2021-06-25
img

I'm not the robot, pal, you are

Something for the Weekend, Sir?  I have failed the Turing test – again. Apparently I am unable to exhibit intelligent behaviour equivalent to that of a human being.…

Monte Martin 2021-04-20
img

Maybe I should have stopped after I uncovered my mother’s old artist’s portfolio, leaning against a half-wall covered in cobwebs. I gently thumbed through the contents: a stencil of well-worn cowboy boots, a sketch of the dinner bell from my childhood, a charcoal portrait of a naked man. With a moustache. Dad?! I was hoping to find heirlooms, not my dad’s youthful and anatomically correct body.

But I had my reasons for being up there in the first place.

Maskless Covidiots in my apartment building in New York forced me to flee to my parents’ house an hour north of the city. So while they were golfing and sipping cocktails in Florida, I was pacing their suburban home in the woods, panicked and convinced they were as good as dead.

“You’re never going to die” was my whimsical response to my parents (now in their late 70s) whenever the subject came up. I was able to hold denial and the inevitable simultaneously ― until the pandemic body-slammed me with reality, that is. When I allow myself to reflect on this at all, my fantasy is that my parents go out together, because otherwise it would betoo devastating for the one who got left behind. Also, Ican’t imagine planning two separate shivas.

Whether it’s my dad’s hearing loss or my mom’s dicey driving, watching them age is sobering ― and probably more so for them. But I’m fortunate. We have a tight bond, and our love for individual therapy has encouraged honest communication. Nothing is left unsaid. They know where they failed me as parents, and once a year, I apologise for being a colossal bitch during my divorce.

Like many people sheltering at home, I couldn’t do much of anything other than sanitising heavily trafficked countertops and door handles. After two days, it hit me. Traffic? I’m the only one here. Marking my days with mundane tasks, like replacing the toilet seat covers with slow-close lids and dumping food with expiration dates earlier than December 2019, wasn’t distracting me from my dread.

Decluttering and tidying my parents’ attic was a preemptive strike, designed to mitigate the trauma of touching their belongings after their death, when I’d be grieving and inconsolable. My throat tightened just thinking about it. I didn’t ask my parents for permission beforehand because I was afraid of being denied. Also, I didn’t want them to know I was considering their demise.

I sat on my camp trunk and FaceTimed my mom. “Hey, I’m cleaning out the attic for you. Can I ditch the busted laundry baskets? How about the defective suitcases and ripped window screens? Fine,” I sighed. “What about donating the Norelco hair dryer?” When I was little, my mom would sometimes set my hair in big fat rollers after taking a bath and then sit me under the dryer like we were at a salon. It made me feel glamorous.

Boxes of slide carousels stood balanced in the middle of the room, like a game of Jenga. Slideshows were hugely popular during family gatherings growing up. I pulled a few out and held them up to the light. My brother and I are spinning in a teacup at Disney World. Dad and I are practicing free throws in the driveway. My mom is presenting a can of walnuts to the camera. I stacked the boxes at the door, excited to digitise them once it was safe to be in the world again.

That’s when I came across Mom’s portfolio of drawings, including Dad in all his naked glory. Undeterred, I shrugged it off in the name of abstract art and moved on. 

Alongside a commercial coffee urn was an old reel-to-reel film projector. As a filmmaker, I wondered why they hadn’t entrusted it to me instead of letting it rust. I opened a crushed box beside the projector. Metal canisters of 8mm film spilled out of a ripped shopping bag. Red spools of exposed film were unraveling, and I rewound them. Wow, I thought, I’ve got to digitise these home movies as well. 

A few questions come to mind when you find peeling porn labels written in your dad’s chicken scratch: Two Lesbians-artful, Bath scene-great ending, Two guys kissing-very good. Questions like: When was the last screening? Was I in my bedroom studying geometry at the time?

It would have been easier to write off if it were just a few reels, but the sheer volume looked like my parents might’ve owned a retail store, and that was weird.

I reflexively started rocking back and forth, davening between intrigue and nausea. Here I was, alone with their porn, while they were probably aqua-jogging in Florida wearing face shields. I had no context. I darted from the room, tripping over a straw sombrero. 

Intellectually, I know my parents are human beings with desires; good for them. But did I have to find those desires? Why aren’t they in a safe that I don’t have the combination to? My parents weren’t big on setting boundaries when I was growing up, so I set them for myself. I didn’t want equal footing ― they weren’t my friends. And I was uninterested in the intimate details of their past.

My phone rang. It was my mom.

I tried to decide whether to tell her what I’d found. Would it enrich our lives? Change how I felt about them? My head is teeming with important information from them: ancestral history, holiday traditions and Borscht Belt comedy. I know where my dad keeps the wills, the health directives and the list of those uninvited to the funeral. What more do I need to know?

But I did tell her. 

She was matter-of-fact. “When you open Pandora’s box, you never know what you’re gonna find.” She paused. “You’re a little late to the party. Your brother found the box decades ago. Oh, and Dad said to leave his stuff. He’ll go through it when we get home.” 

I hung up the phone and laughed. My mom’s nonchalant attitude had helped me to put things into perspective. Her breezy tone made me consider the possibility that my discomfort was my burden alone, and that perhaps my disgust was an overreaction. 

All of these years later, even as a grown-up (allegedly), I was still setting boundaries, thinking that my parents (and I) needed protection from potential embarrassment. I was letting my child-self dictate the woman that I am today.

My unease evaporated, as if I were evolving right there in the laundry room of their house. I didn’t care about my parents’ stash. I cared that I had them around to laugh with. 

It was selfish to rummage through my parents’ things. Finding their mementos spoke to their curiosity, spirit and youth, giving me a deeper understanding of who they are as people.

I’m not entirely over my hang-ups, but I do feel closer to them. I still wish it hadn’t happened, but maybe it’s time I let go of some of my strident ideas and embrace my parents (and their smut) for who they are. For as long as I’m able to. 

This article first appeared on HuffPost Personal

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

Monte Martin 2021-03-20
img
The Xe HPG chip is the first PC gaming chip coming from Intel. The company has already tied up with Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) to make these chips
Monte Martin 2021-03-09
img
Upcoming changes to the way the Ethereum network operates will render mining GPUs effectively redundant.
Monte Martin 2021-01-22
img
The Wynn Las Vegas is a high-end resort right on The Strip that features a casino, spa, restaurants, theaters, and impressive new COVID-19 protocols.
Monte Martin 2020-12-22
img
Porsche designed the 992 around the PDK gearbox; why is the manual so darn good?
Monte Martin 2020-11-30
img

You can’t judge a book by its cover. You can judge it based on peer recommendations. Here are 67 picks for a great bookcase to improve your content marketing, expand your marketing prowess, and gain inspiration. Continue reading

The post 67 Book Picks for the Ultimate Content Marketing Library appeared first on Content Marketing Institute.

Monte Martin 2020-09-30
img
(Cell Press) Researchers at Columbia University have developed AwareDX--Analysing Women At Risk for Experiencing Drug toXicity--a machine learning algorithm that identifies and predicts differences in adverse drug effects between men and women by analyzing 50 years' worth of reports in an FDA database. The algorithm, described September 22 in the journal Patterns, automatically corrects for the biases in these data that stem from an overrepresentation of male subjects in clinical research trials.