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Randall Vincent 2021-06-29
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The iMac Pro is dead and gone -- or is it? Apple could bring it back as the high-end sibling to the 24-inch iMac. If it does, here’s everything we could see.
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Randall Vincent 2021-03-05
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The 75-year-old antivirus entrepreneur faces up to 80 years in prison if convicted.
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0
Randall Vincent 2020-10-03
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The Google Pixel 5 forgoes a flagship processor in favour of the mid-range Snapdragon 765G. Let's look at why.
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Randall Vincent 2019-05-08
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That company, Lora DiCarlo, makes a device that taps advanced microrobotics to give women hands-free orgasms.

The company still made an appearance at a smaller nighttime show, but nowhere near the main CES show floor where it was denied placement, and not at the Innovation Awards ceremony.

"This prompted some important conversations internally and with external advisors and we look forward to taking these learnings to continue to improve the show."

In a follow-up call, Foster said the CTA is always looking to expand the show into new areas.

"We appreciate this gesture from the CTA, who have taken an important step in the right direction to remove the stigma and embarrassment around female sexuality.

This is a win for our engineering team, who deserve recognition for the robotic technology they developed in the making of Osé.

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Randall Vincent 2021-06-23
img
Ancient species may re-enter the ecosystem as the world's permafrost thaws.
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0
Randall Vincent 2020-10-29
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) It's still easy to think we're in control when browsing the internet, but a new study argues much of that is "an illusion." Corporations are "nudging" us online more than we realize, and often in hidden ways. Researchers analyzed clickstream data on a million people over one month of internet use to find common browsing sequences, then connected that with site and platform ownership and partnerships, as well as site design and other factors.
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0
Randall Vincent 2020-09-23
img
High-end Garmin features in a much more affordable watch.
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0
Randall Vincent 2019-06-06
img

Yesterday, the National Coalition Against Censorship (NCAC) announced that Facebook will reconsider its nudity guidelines, which currently bans photographic nudity, and more controversially, “female nipples.”

The news comes just days after activists stripped naked outside Facebook’s and Instagram’s New York headquarters to protest the platforms’ censorship regulations around artistic nudity.

NCAC confirmed the social media giant had agreed to a meeting with a “group of stakeholders including artists, art educators, museum curators, activists, as well as Facebook employees.”

During the meeting, which has no set date but is believed to happen some time this summer, they “will discuss the issue of nude photographic art and the harm done to artists, provide insights into the challenges Facebook has faced in developing its nudity policies, and explore ideas for a path forward.”

The protest that could free the nipple

The WeTheNipple protest which took place on June 1 was photographed and designed by Spencer Tunick.

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0
Randall Vincent 2021-04-21
img
How one couple built a device to fix McDonald’s notoriously broken soft-serve machines.
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0
Randall Vincent 2020-10-24
img
The rallygoer was filmed repeatedly flashing an "OK sign" while standing behind President Trump during his speech in The Villages on Friday.
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0
Randall Vincent 2020-08-16
img

It’s taken Matthew Norwood decades to recognise that he was a child victim of grooming and exploitation.

He was selling drugs from the age of 13 and by 16 he’d served time and become adept at spotting loneliness and neglect in other children, turning these vulnerabilities into a recruitment tool.

“You make them feel part of something,” he says, describing how he’d spot a child hanging near the group and strike up a chat or ask them to run an errand.

If they seemed gratified by the attention, he’d get them to stash some weed, or give them food, money or gifts to cement a sense of obligation. 

Today’s county lines gangs use similar strategies, but escalate rapidly to coercion, often staging robberies of money or drugs left in the child’s care and forcing them to work for years to repay the debt. 

They know they’re exploiting kids. But they don’t care. You justify it. ‘I’m feeding them, that kid’s getting money. If I don’t do it someone else would’Matthew Norwood, CEO of 1Message

Typically this involves trafficking the young person to small towns for days or weeks on end to deal drugs from houses that Simon Harding, director of theNational Centre for Gang Research, describes as “filthy, rat-infested hellholes.” Violence and sexual abuse are rife. 

“They know they’re exploiting kids. But they don’t care. You justify it. ‘I’m feeding them, that kid’s getting money. If I don’t do it someone else would’,” says Matthew, who as CEO of1Message now trains others to detect signs of grooming.

The UK is in the midst of a modern slavery crisis. Every year since 2014, the number of people identified as potential victims of forced labour hassoared, reaching 10,627 referrals last year – a 52% rise from 2018.

 

Lockdown removed many of the usual ways of identifying children at risk of being exploited by gangsAnne Longfield, children's commissioner for England

Worryingly, in the first three months of 2020, there was a sharp drop in these referrals; not because modern slavery is in decline, but rather because efforts to contain Covid-19 disrupted frontline services, meaning there have been fewer opportunities to spot those at risk.

Data collected by the Home Office shows that the largest group of modern slavery victims are now Britishchildren.

Almost all of these are British boys trafficked into forced labour by county lines gangs – a trend that charities and police warn has continued unabated during lockdown, as children are driven cross-country by their traffickers instead of relying on public transport, sometimes disguised as key workers.

The National Youth Agency launched a campaign during lockdown for youth workers to be classed as key workers, following its report that found organised crime gangs had adapted quickly to the pandemic and were grooming youngsters out of sight of the authorities. 

Anne Longfield Childrens Commissioner for England

Responding to the report, titled Hidden in Plain Sight, children’s commissioner Anne Longfield said: “Lockdown removed many of the usual ways of identifying children at risk of being exploited by gangs. With the closure of schools and youth centres, thousands of vulnerable young people have simply gone off the radar.

“As rules are relaxed there will be particular dangers for young people at risk of criminal exploitation.”

While lockdown is easing, for children who have been entrapped into modern slavery conditions by county lines gangs, the nightmare is likely to last for years.

“He went from being this laid-back lad to acting up, getting angry and anxious. He’d lose it over something silly and punch a hole in his bedroom door,” says Penny, whose then-teenage son was a promising gamer who competed in international tournaments.

When he and his girlfriend got pregnant, he began looking for more reliable sources of income – then disappearing for days on end. “He’d come back three or four days later, wearing someone else’s clothes and couldn’t look me in the eye,” says Penny.

“He was getting beaten. It aged him. I could see the damage that had been done to him”. Years later, in his 20s and in prison, he remains terrified of his traffickers. 

 

Stock picture of a teenage girl using an iPhone.

 

While economic pressure makes a young person especially vulnerable, county lines recruiters will prey on any kids who feel ignored, says Sheldon Thomas, former gang member and founder ofGangsline.

“When you don’t feel loved at home or grow up without a father figure, the rejection is very severe”. 

Christina Gabbitas, author of No More Knives, agrees. “It’s about educating your children, giving your children time,” she says. If they don’t get attention at home, “they will go get this from elsewhere.”

Some victims on the cusp of adulthood fall through the cracks because they’re too young for adult support programs or too old for child services. At 17, Amanda was sentenced to nine months in prison for her first offence: trafficking cannabis. As a minor, Amanda wasn’t eligible for the standard discharge grant (now £46) available to newly released prisoners.

“They gave me a train ticket and dropped me at the station,” she says.

A vulnerable teenager with no support network, within months Amanda met a man who “scared the living daylights” out of her, driving her to different towns and cities and forcing her to work as a prostitute.

“One night he took me to London, dropped me on the street at two in the morning with crack users everywhere and said don’t come back until you’ve made £300,” she recalls. “I was petrified”. Amanda found a phone box, called a number inside for Childline and told them what had happened – but the children’s charity couldn’t help. Amanda had now turned 18.

While it’s now generally understood that there’s no such thing as a child prostitute, no such consensus exists on whether a child can be a drug dealer.

Jeffrey Williams-Baah, who leads the Children’s Society’s STRIDE project to support boys at risk of criminal exploitation, says the organisation urges law enforcement to treat children as victims, not perpetrators. 

This is gradually gaining traction. Tim Champion, head of the National County Lines Coordination Centre, secured the first ever county lines conviction under the Modern Slavery Act in 2017 and other offenders have beenprosecuted for trafficking minors since.

But high-profile raids like July’s Operation Venetic do little to address the underlying risk factors; as Champion notes, “even if county lines was wound up, these children would still be susceptible to being preyed upon by people wanting to make profits.” 

Worse, some children exploited for criminal labour are recruited for work unpaid for the police too, in extraordinarily dangerous circumstances and without an independent safeguarding body.

While under-17s can’t sign a witness statement without a parent or guardian present, no such law exists when recruiting informants. A courtruled in 2019 that children can be used for up to four months without formal review.

As former undercover drug cop Neil Woods explains, drug dealers have long used kids as a “buffer zone” to distance themselves from the police – “and it works”.

Kept at arm’s length from potential adult informants, he says, police resorted to children, putting them in greater danger. Gangs know that when a child is taken into custody, police will try to recruit them, so step up efforts to terrify them into keeping quiet.

“It’s unbelievable when you think about it. Especially when kids who come into contact with police are more likely to be vulnerable,” says Woods.

Covid-19 is making these young people even more vulnerable.

As Williams-Baah says, the lockdown leaves kids with little to do, while those experiencing stressful home lives are unable to access safe, supportive spaces. Domestic violence has soared.

Meanwhile, the austerity cuts that followed the last recession pushed 30% of children, including nearly half of all Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME) households, into poverty. Now, the pandemic has pushed 12% of 16- to 24-year-olds into debt and cost one in 10 their jobs. 

“It seems to young people, everyone wants something from them,” says Amanda, who received 30 convictions for prostitution before she escaped her trafficker to a woman’s refuge.

“The dealers want them to sell. The police want the information to get the dealers. And the young people don’t feel that the police give a s*** about them. I think the key factor in helping these young people is to communicate that someone does actually give a shit. They do care.”

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0
Randall Vincent 2019-06-01
img

Bumpy car rides suck and a newly published patent reveals Apple has fairly recently been exploring a “fully-actuated suspension system” using variable pressure air springs and a haptic-feedback system to create a smoother ride.

The patent was originally filed in March 2016 with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and originates from Apple’s Project Titan division.

It was finally published this week.

The filing features a lot of technical gobbledygook, but in essence, it describes a suspension system that can “compensate for vehicle oscillations at frequencies below the primary ride frequency,” which would in turn potentially reduce motion sickness.

It also details improvements to its braking and suspension for a generally smoother ride.

That’s all well and good, but one of the more interesting parts of the patent is a section where Apple details a haptic feedback system.

collect
0
Randall Vincent 2021-04-02
img
Gaetz told The Hill that rumors that he plans to resign are "false" and that it's "very safe" to say he won't step down.
collect
0
Randall Vincent 2020-10-09
img

Songwriter‘s block can be a problem for even the world’s most successful musicians. They can sometimes overcome it by taking breaks, seeking new forms of inspiration, or simply pushing through. And if none of that works, they could try out a new AI lyrics generator called keyword2lyrics. The system was created by Mathi Gatthi, a data scientist from Argentina, who told TNW he got the idea from his own songwriting struggles: Sometimes I have a few ideas that I want to turn into a song, but I’m too lazy for that, so I thought it would be cool to make a program that generates lyrics…

This story continues at The Next Web
collect
0
Randall Vincent 2019-07-05
img

Lexus announced its intention to offer a convertible version of the LC, its range-topping coupe, by sending a camouflaged prototype to the annual Goodwood Festival of Speed taking place in England.

The venue is certainly fitting: It’s a celebration of all things quick and extravagant.

While the QR code-inspired camouflage mostly hides the drop-top’s overall lines, we can immediately tell it looks a lot like the LC Convertible concept unveiled during the 2019 Detroit Auto Show.

The topless LC hasn’t changed much in its transition from a design study to a close-to-production prototype.

It’s as futuristically-styled as its hardtop sibling, it looks like a street-legal concept car, and losing its top hasn’t drastically altered its low-slung stance.

The interior receives a digital, driver-configurable instrument cluster, and an infotainment system controlled via a touchpad mounted on the center console.

collect
0
Randall Vincent 2019-05-23

One of the world’s top Fortnite streamers filed a lawsuit this week claiming that the popular e-sports organization Faze Clan has been financially exploiting him.

The lawsuit paints Faze Clan as abusive, pressuring the streamer to do dangerous stunts and drink underage, but the story is ultimately one about getting out of a contract, so that the increasingly successful streamer can stake out on his own.

It’s a new situation for e-sports, but not for online video creators in general — YouTubers faced similar issues some years ago when they relied on organized networks to grow, but have since abandoned them for more lucrative individual opportunities.

Faze Clan is an organization that works with players and streamers to help them secure brand deals and play in tournaments.

The organization has denied all allegations and, just a couple of days after the lawsuits was filed, Tenney is backtracking on some of it, too.

Tenney said in a YouTube video published last night that “all the stuff about the gambling, the stunts, the drinking” wasn’t accurate.

collect
0
Randall Vincent 2021-06-29
img
The iMac Pro is dead and gone -- or is it? Apple could bring it back as the high-end sibling to the 24-inch iMac. If it does, here’s everything we could see.
Randall Vincent 2021-04-21
img
How one couple built a device to fix McDonald’s notoriously broken soft-serve machines.
Randall Vincent 2021-03-05
img
The 75-year-old antivirus entrepreneur faces up to 80 years in prison if convicted.
Randall Vincent 2020-10-24
img
The rallygoer was filmed repeatedly flashing an "OK sign" while standing behind President Trump during his speech in The Villages on Friday.
Randall Vincent 2020-10-03
img
The Google Pixel 5 forgoes a flagship processor in favour of the mid-range Snapdragon 765G. Let's look at why.
Randall Vincent 2020-08-16
img

It’s taken Matthew Norwood decades to recognise that he was a child victim of grooming and exploitation.

He was selling drugs from the age of 13 and by 16 he’d served time and become adept at spotting loneliness and neglect in other children, turning these vulnerabilities into a recruitment tool.

“You make them feel part of something,” he says, describing how he’d spot a child hanging near the group and strike up a chat or ask them to run an errand.

If they seemed gratified by the attention, he’d get them to stash some weed, or give them food, money or gifts to cement a sense of obligation. 

Today’s county lines gangs use similar strategies, but escalate rapidly to coercion, often staging robberies of money or drugs left in the child’s care and forcing them to work for years to repay the debt. 

They know they’re exploiting kids. But they don’t care. You justify it. ‘I’m feeding them, that kid’s getting money. If I don’t do it someone else would’Matthew Norwood, CEO of 1Message

Typically this involves trafficking the young person to small towns for days or weeks on end to deal drugs from houses that Simon Harding, director of theNational Centre for Gang Research, describes as “filthy, rat-infested hellholes.” Violence and sexual abuse are rife. 

“They know they’re exploiting kids. But they don’t care. You justify it. ‘I’m feeding them, that kid’s getting money. If I don’t do it someone else would’,” says Matthew, who as CEO of1Message now trains others to detect signs of grooming.

The UK is in the midst of a modern slavery crisis. Every year since 2014, the number of people identified as potential victims of forced labour hassoared, reaching 10,627 referrals last year – a 52% rise from 2018.

 

Lockdown removed many of the usual ways of identifying children at risk of being exploited by gangsAnne Longfield, children's commissioner for England

Worryingly, in the first three months of 2020, there was a sharp drop in these referrals; not because modern slavery is in decline, but rather because efforts to contain Covid-19 disrupted frontline services, meaning there have been fewer opportunities to spot those at risk.

Data collected by the Home Office shows that the largest group of modern slavery victims are now Britishchildren.

Almost all of these are British boys trafficked into forced labour by county lines gangs – a trend that charities and police warn has continued unabated during lockdown, as children are driven cross-country by their traffickers instead of relying on public transport, sometimes disguised as key workers.

The National Youth Agency launched a campaign during lockdown for youth workers to be classed as key workers, following its report that found organised crime gangs had adapted quickly to the pandemic and were grooming youngsters out of sight of the authorities. 

Anne Longfield Childrens Commissioner for England

Responding to the report, titled Hidden in Plain Sight, children’s commissioner Anne Longfield said: “Lockdown removed many of the usual ways of identifying children at risk of being exploited by gangs. With the closure of schools and youth centres, thousands of vulnerable young people have simply gone off the radar.

“As rules are relaxed there will be particular dangers for young people at risk of criminal exploitation.”

While lockdown is easing, for children who have been entrapped into modern slavery conditions by county lines gangs, the nightmare is likely to last for years.

“He went from being this laid-back lad to acting up, getting angry and anxious. He’d lose it over something silly and punch a hole in his bedroom door,” says Penny, whose then-teenage son was a promising gamer who competed in international tournaments.

When he and his girlfriend got pregnant, he began looking for more reliable sources of income – then disappearing for days on end. “He’d come back three or four days later, wearing someone else’s clothes and couldn’t look me in the eye,” says Penny.

“He was getting beaten. It aged him. I could see the damage that had been done to him”. Years later, in his 20s and in prison, he remains terrified of his traffickers. 

 

Stock picture of a teenage girl using an iPhone.

 

While economic pressure makes a young person especially vulnerable, county lines recruiters will prey on any kids who feel ignored, says Sheldon Thomas, former gang member and founder ofGangsline.

“When you don’t feel loved at home or grow up without a father figure, the rejection is very severe”. 

Christina Gabbitas, author of No More Knives, agrees. “It’s about educating your children, giving your children time,” she says. If they don’t get attention at home, “they will go get this from elsewhere.”

Some victims on the cusp of adulthood fall through the cracks because they’re too young for adult support programs or too old for child services. At 17, Amanda was sentenced to nine months in prison for her first offence: trafficking cannabis. As a minor, Amanda wasn’t eligible for the standard discharge grant (now £46) available to newly released prisoners.

“They gave me a train ticket and dropped me at the station,” she says.

A vulnerable teenager with no support network, within months Amanda met a man who “scared the living daylights” out of her, driving her to different towns and cities and forcing her to work as a prostitute.

“One night he took me to London, dropped me on the street at two in the morning with crack users everywhere and said don’t come back until you’ve made £300,” she recalls. “I was petrified”. Amanda found a phone box, called a number inside for Childline and told them what had happened – but the children’s charity couldn’t help. Amanda had now turned 18.

While it’s now generally understood that there’s no such thing as a child prostitute, no such consensus exists on whether a child can be a drug dealer.

Jeffrey Williams-Baah, who leads the Children’s Society’s STRIDE project to support boys at risk of criminal exploitation, says the organisation urges law enforcement to treat children as victims, not perpetrators. 

This is gradually gaining traction. Tim Champion, head of the National County Lines Coordination Centre, secured the first ever county lines conviction under the Modern Slavery Act in 2017 and other offenders have beenprosecuted for trafficking minors since.

But high-profile raids like July’s Operation Venetic do little to address the underlying risk factors; as Champion notes, “even if county lines was wound up, these children would still be susceptible to being preyed upon by people wanting to make profits.” 

Worse, some children exploited for criminal labour are recruited for work unpaid for the police too, in extraordinarily dangerous circumstances and without an independent safeguarding body.

While under-17s can’t sign a witness statement without a parent or guardian present, no such law exists when recruiting informants. A courtruled in 2019 that children can be used for up to four months without formal review.

As former undercover drug cop Neil Woods explains, drug dealers have long used kids as a “buffer zone” to distance themselves from the police – “and it works”.

Kept at arm’s length from potential adult informants, he says, police resorted to children, putting them in greater danger. Gangs know that when a child is taken into custody, police will try to recruit them, so step up efforts to terrify them into keeping quiet.

“It’s unbelievable when you think about it. Especially when kids who come into contact with police are more likely to be vulnerable,” says Woods.

Covid-19 is making these young people even more vulnerable.

As Williams-Baah says, the lockdown leaves kids with little to do, while those experiencing stressful home lives are unable to access safe, supportive spaces. Domestic violence has soared.

Meanwhile, the austerity cuts that followed the last recession pushed 30% of children, including nearly half of all Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME) households, into poverty. Now, the pandemic has pushed 12% of 16- to 24-year-olds into debt and cost one in 10 their jobs. 

“It seems to young people, everyone wants something from them,” says Amanda, who received 30 convictions for prostitution before she escaped her trafficker to a woman’s refuge.

“The dealers want them to sell. The police want the information to get the dealers. And the young people don’t feel that the police give a s*** about them. I think the key factor in helping these young people is to communicate that someone does actually give a shit. They do care.”

Randall Vincent 2019-05-08
img

That company, Lora DiCarlo, makes a device that taps advanced microrobotics to give women hands-free orgasms.

The company still made an appearance at a smaller nighttime show, but nowhere near the main CES show floor where it was denied placement, and not at the Innovation Awards ceremony.

"This prompted some important conversations internally and with external advisors and we look forward to taking these learnings to continue to improve the show."

In a follow-up call, Foster said the CTA is always looking to expand the show into new areas.

"We appreciate this gesture from the CTA, who have taken an important step in the right direction to remove the stigma and embarrassment around female sexuality.

This is a win for our engineering team, who deserve recognition for the robotic technology they developed in the making of Osé.

Randall Vincent 2019-06-01
img

Bumpy car rides suck and a newly published patent reveals Apple has fairly recently been exploring a “fully-actuated suspension system” using variable pressure air springs and a haptic-feedback system to create a smoother ride.

The patent was originally filed in March 2016 with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and originates from Apple’s Project Titan division.

It was finally published this week.

The filing features a lot of technical gobbledygook, but in essence, it describes a suspension system that can “compensate for vehicle oscillations at frequencies below the primary ride frequency,” which would in turn potentially reduce motion sickness.

It also details improvements to its braking and suspension for a generally smoother ride.

That’s all well and good, but one of the more interesting parts of the patent is a section where Apple details a haptic feedback system.

Randall Vincent 2021-06-23
img
Ancient species may re-enter the ecosystem as the world's permafrost thaws.
Randall Vincent 2021-04-02
img
Gaetz told The Hill that rumors that he plans to resign are "false" and that it's "very safe" to say he won't step down.
Randall Vincent 2020-10-29
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) It's still easy to think we're in control when browsing the internet, but a new study argues much of that is "an illusion." Corporations are "nudging" us online more than we realize, and often in hidden ways. Researchers analyzed clickstream data on a million people over one month of internet use to find common browsing sequences, then connected that with site and platform ownership and partnerships, as well as site design and other factors.
Randall Vincent 2020-10-09
img

Songwriter‘s block can be a problem for even the world’s most successful musicians. They can sometimes overcome it by taking breaks, seeking new forms of inspiration, or simply pushing through. And if none of that works, they could try out a new AI lyrics generator called keyword2lyrics. The system was created by Mathi Gatthi, a data scientist from Argentina, who told TNW he got the idea from his own songwriting struggles: Sometimes I have a few ideas that I want to turn into a song, but I’m too lazy for that, so I thought it would be cool to make a program that generates lyrics…

This story continues at The Next Web
Randall Vincent 2020-09-23
img
High-end Garmin features in a much more affordable watch.
Randall Vincent 2019-07-05
img

Lexus announced its intention to offer a convertible version of the LC, its range-topping coupe, by sending a camouflaged prototype to the annual Goodwood Festival of Speed taking place in England.

The venue is certainly fitting: It’s a celebration of all things quick and extravagant.

While the QR code-inspired camouflage mostly hides the drop-top’s overall lines, we can immediately tell it looks a lot like the LC Convertible concept unveiled during the 2019 Detroit Auto Show.

The topless LC hasn’t changed much in its transition from a design study to a close-to-production prototype.

It’s as futuristically-styled as its hardtop sibling, it looks like a street-legal concept car, and losing its top hasn’t drastically altered its low-slung stance.

The interior receives a digital, driver-configurable instrument cluster, and an infotainment system controlled via a touchpad mounted on the center console.

Randall Vincent 2019-06-06
img

Yesterday, the National Coalition Against Censorship (NCAC) announced that Facebook will reconsider its nudity guidelines, which currently bans photographic nudity, and more controversially, “female nipples.”

The news comes just days after activists stripped naked outside Facebook’s and Instagram’s New York headquarters to protest the platforms’ censorship regulations around artistic nudity.

NCAC confirmed the social media giant had agreed to a meeting with a “group of stakeholders including artists, art educators, museum curators, activists, as well as Facebook employees.”

During the meeting, which has no set date but is believed to happen some time this summer, they “will discuss the issue of nude photographic art and the harm done to artists, provide insights into the challenges Facebook has faced in developing its nudity policies, and explore ideas for a path forward.”

The protest that could free the nipple

The WeTheNipple protest which took place on June 1 was photographed and designed by Spencer Tunick.

Randall Vincent 2019-05-23

One of the world’s top Fortnite streamers filed a lawsuit this week claiming that the popular e-sports organization Faze Clan has been financially exploiting him.

The lawsuit paints Faze Clan as abusive, pressuring the streamer to do dangerous stunts and drink underage, but the story is ultimately one about getting out of a contract, so that the increasingly successful streamer can stake out on his own.

It’s a new situation for e-sports, but not for online video creators in general — YouTubers faced similar issues some years ago when they relied on organized networks to grow, but have since abandoned them for more lucrative individual opportunities.

Faze Clan is an organization that works with players and streamers to help them secure brand deals and play in tournaments.

The organization has denied all allegations and, just a couple of days after the lawsuits was filed, Tenney is backtracking on some of it, too.

Tenney said in a YouTube video published last night that “all the stuff about the gambling, the stunts, the drinking” wasn’t accurate.