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Rex Canale 2021-06-30
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Cosby is set to walk free due to a deal he made with Bruce Castor, who was widely mocked over his performance in Trump's second impeachment trial.
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0
Rex Canale 2021-03-03
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In this week’s Out of Office column, Megan tackles guilt, bad policies, and the rules of zoomfood.
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0
Rex Canale 2020-09-02
img
It's the most massive, distant, and energetic black-hole merger yet.
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0
Rex Canale 2020-07-15
img
Our inital Peacock review shows that being free to view is great, but it still needs a lot of work with features and content.
collect
0
Rex Canale 2021-06-28
img

Garden hose + handy tap = bad times

Who, Me?  Feeling the burn? Stress getting to you? Today's edition of Who, Me? concerns pressure of a different sort as a Reg reader experiences a most unexpected deluge.…

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Rex Canale 2020-12-23
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Star Wars, Dragon Quest and more.
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0
Rex Canale 2020-08-06

s President Donald Trump speaks during a signing ceremony for

  • Trump issued an executive order Thursday evening prohibiting US individuals and companies from making "any transactions" with TikTok's parent company ByteDance.
  • The order, which is set to go into effect in 45 days, claims TikTok "continues to threaten the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States."
  • Trump has sought to force the sale of TikTok to an American company with a "very big proportion" of the sale proceeds going to the US government.
  • Trump previously said he would ban the app from operating within the US entirely, though it's unclear what legal authority he has to do that.
  • Microsoft has been in talks with ByteDance to acquire the app, and Trump said this week that he would require any sale to an American company to include a "very big" cut going to the US government.
  • Trump also issued a similar order Thursday concerning transactions with WeChat, which is owned by Chinese internet giant Tencent. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump issued an executive order Thursday that bans US individuals and companies from doing business with TikTok, which is owned by Chinese-based firm ByteDance, citing national security concerns.

The order, which is set to go into effect 45 days from Thursday, prohibits "any transaction by any person, or with respect to any property, subject to the jurisdiction of the United States."

It's unclear at this point the extent to which either order is legal or enforceable, and both will likely face challenges in court.

Trump also issued a nearly identical order shortly after that targets WeChat, which is owned by Chinese internet giant Tencent, again citing national security concerns.

"The spread in the United States of mobile applications developed and owned by companies in [China] continues to threaten the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States," the order said.

In the orders, Trump alleges that TikTok and WeChat's data collection practices could "allow the Chinese Communist Party access to Americans' personal and proprietary information — potentially allowing China to track the locations of Federal employees and contractors, build dossiers of personal information for blackmail, and conduct corporate espionage."

TikTok did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Other US politicians and government agencies, including Joe Biden's campaign and several military and government agencies, have issued bans on the usage of TikTok by their staff over similar concerns. However, experts have pointed out that the app collects user data in similar ways to US-based competitors like Facebook.

The orders also claim that both apps censor content that the Chinese government considers "politically sensitive,"  such as content about Hong Kong protests and its treatment of Muslim minority Uighurs.

Trump has ratcheted up his threats against TikTok in particular over the past few weeks, saying he would ban the app entirely if ByteDance didn't sell its stake in TikTok to an American company by September 15.

Microsoft said earlier this month that it was in talks to buy the stake, with the app reportedly being worth between $30 billion and $50 billion.

Microsoft declined to comment for this story.

Trump also promised to force any acquisition deal involving a US-based company to include a "very big proportion" of the sale price going to the US Treasury Department.

The president has the authority under a 1988 law to block foreign business deals pertaining to US companies if he considers the deals to be a national security threat, which he has used twice before to block deals involving firms from China and Singapore that were looking to acquire American companies.

Trump, who regularly blames the coronavirus pandemic on China and previously said his TikTok ban was meant to punish the country over its response, has also waged a years-long trade war with the country and previously penalized other Chinese tech companies including Huawei and ZTE.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

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Rex Canale 2019-11-15
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If you sometimes find yourself happening upon a word you’ve no idea how to pronounce, a new feature announced by Google this week is here to help.

Baked right into its Search tool, all you do is type in, “Pronounce [word],” and then hit Go.

At the top of the results, you’ll see a little box with the word spelled out phonetically, and bold type indicating where to place the stress.

As with Google’s word definitions, you’ll also see a little speaker icon, which, when you tap on it, plays an audio clip of someone saying the word so you can hear exactly how to pronounce it.

If you tap on the “practice” button and speak the word into your microphone, Google’s speech recognition and machine learning software will assess your effort and respond immediately with some tips if it needs improvement.

“Studies have shown that practicing how to say a word can be helpful for remembering it, especially when you’re learning a new language,” Google’s Tal Snir wrote in a blog post announcing the new feature.

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Rex Canale 2021-05-13
img
Antonio Garcia Martinez, a recent hire, is apparently no longer working at Apple, after uproar over his past writings slamming women as "soft and weak" and "generally full of shit."
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0
Rex Canale 2020-09-24
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After months of delays, U-turns, technical issues, and criticism from privacy campaigners, the UK government has finally launched its contact-tracing app in England and Wales. The revamped NHS COVID-19 app uses Bluetooth to track the time people spend near other users and the distance between them. When an individual falls ill, they can report it in the app, which then alerts anyone who’s been close to them. If the system’s algorithm calculates that their contact was high-risk, they’ll be told to self-isolate. They can also use the app to access local risk alerts, QR check-in at venues, a symptom checker, and test booking. Health and Social…

This story continues at The Next Web
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Rex Canale 2020-07-29
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The internet is full of irksome words – “heckin,” “awesomesauce,” “updoot” – but the worst one by far is “hubby.”
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Rex Canale 2019-10-29

Netflix is testing a feature that lets you watch movies and TV shows at up to 1.5 times the normal speed – and the film industry isn't happy about it.

The option to tweak playback speed is currently being tested with Android users, reports Android Police.

The ability to view in slow-motion will be welcomed by eagle-eyed viewers who want to capture every moment of a scene, or for anyone wanting to check a minor detail.

Alternatively, if you're pushed for time and looking to cram in as many episodes as possible into a weekend, faster playback will be a real boon.

Filmmakers, however, are not pleased.

Sincerely,Peyton Reed https://t.co/iPq10ywKfzOctober 28, 2019

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0
Rex Canale 2021-05-01
img
As part of a $1.2 billion bond sale and refinancing, Vornado Realty Trust and The Trump Organization were set to get $617 million, Bloomberg reported.
collect
0
Rex Canale 2020-09-19
img
Confused by megapixels? Overwhelmed by refresh rates? Fear not – here’s everything you need to know about choosing your next Android handset
collect
0
Rex Canale 2020-07-21
img
If anything, these new initiatives show that earlier efforts just weren’t enough.
collect
0
Rex Canale 2019-09-05
img

Facebook Dating is finally here.

The social network launched the feature today in the US and 19 other countries, after announcing it last year at its F8 developer conference.

The feature will be available to users above the age of 18 and, for those eligible, will appear as a new tab in the Facebook app.

Importantly, you’ll have a separate profile for Facebook Dating, meaning your, uh, activities won’t appear on your family’s newsfeed.

Once you sign up, you’ll get suggestions for matches as you do in any other dating app.

You can add friends or Instagram followers to the ‘Secret Crush’ list, and you’ll get a notification if they also add you to their list.

collect
0
Rex Canale 2021-06-30
img
Cosby is set to walk free due to a deal he made with Bruce Castor, who was widely mocked over his performance in Trump's second impeachment trial.
Rex Canale 2021-05-13
img
Antonio Garcia Martinez, a recent hire, is apparently no longer working at Apple, after uproar over his past writings slamming women as "soft and weak" and "generally full of shit."
Rex Canale 2021-03-03
img
In this week’s Out of Office column, Megan tackles guilt, bad policies, and the rules of zoomfood.
Rex Canale 2020-09-24
img

After months of delays, U-turns, technical issues, and criticism from privacy campaigners, the UK government has finally launched its contact-tracing app in England and Wales. The revamped NHS COVID-19 app uses Bluetooth to track the time people spend near other users and the distance between them. When an individual falls ill, they can report it in the app, which then alerts anyone who’s been close to them. If the system’s algorithm calculates that their contact was high-risk, they’ll be told to self-isolate. They can also use the app to access local risk alerts, QR check-in at venues, a symptom checker, and test booking. Health and Social…

This story continues at The Next Web
Rex Canale 2020-09-02
img
It's the most massive, distant, and energetic black-hole merger yet.
Rex Canale 2020-07-29
img
The internet is full of irksome words – “heckin,” “awesomesauce,” “updoot” – but the worst one by far is “hubby.”
Rex Canale 2020-07-15
img
Our inital Peacock review shows that being free to view is great, but it still needs a lot of work with features and content.
Rex Canale 2019-10-29

Netflix is testing a feature that lets you watch movies and TV shows at up to 1.5 times the normal speed – and the film industry isn't happy about it.

The option to tweak playback speed is currently being tested with Android users, reports Android Police.

The ability to view in slow-motion will be welcomed by eagle-eyed viewers who want to capture every moment of a scene, or for anyone wanting to check a minor detail.

Alternatively, if you're pushed for time and looking to cram in as many episodes as possible into a weekend, faster playback will be a real boon.

Filmmakers, however, are not pleased.

Sincerely,Peyton Reed https://t.co/iPq10ywKfzOctober 28, 2019

Rex Canale 2021-06-28
img

Garden hose + handy tap = bad times

Who, Me?  Feeling the burn? Stress getting to you? Today's edition of Who, Me? concerns pressure of a different sort as a Reg reader experiences a most unexpected deluge.…

Rex Canale 2021-05-01
img
As part of a $1.2 billion bond sale and refinancing, Vornado Realty Trust and The Trump Organization were set to get $617 million, Bloomberg reported.
Rex Canale 2020-12-23
img
Star Wars, Dragon Quest and more.
Rex Canale 2020-09-19
img
Confused by megapixels? Overwhelmed by refresh rates? Fear not – here’s everything you need to know about choosing your next Android handset
Rex Canale 2020-08-06

s President Donald Trump speaks during a signing ceremony for

  • Trump issued an executive order Thursday evening prohibiting US individuals and companies from making "any transactions" with TikTok's parent company ByteDance.
  • The order, which is set to go into effect in 45 days, claims TikTok "continues to threaten the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States."
  • Trump has sought to force the sale of TikTok to an American company with a "very big proportion" of the sale proceeds going to the US government.
  • Trump previously said he would ban the app from operating within the US entirely, though it's unclear what legal authority he has to do that.
  • Microsoft has been in talks with ByteDance to acquire the app, and Trump said this week that he would require any sale to an American company to include a "very big" cut going to the US government.
  • Trump also issued a similar order Thursday concerning transactions with WeChat, which is owned by Chinese internet giant Tencent. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump issued an executive order Thursday that bans US individuals and companies from doing business with TikTok, which is owned by Chinese-based firm ByteDance, citing national security concerns.

The order, which is set to go into effect 45 days from Thursday, prohibits "any transaction by any person, or with respect to any property, subject to the jurisdiction of the United States."

It's unclear at this point the extent to which either order is legal or enforceable, and both will likely face challenges in court.

Trump also issued a nearly identical order shortly after that targets WeChat, which is owned by Chinese internet giant Tencent, again citing national security concerns.

"The spread in the United States of mobile applications developed and owned by companies in [China] continues to threaten the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States," the order said.

In the orders, Trump alleges that TikTok and WeChat's data collection practices could "allow the Chinese Communist Party access to Americans' personal and proprietary information — potentially allowing China to track the locations of Federal employees and contractors, build dossiers of personal information for blackmail, and conduct corporate espionage."

TikTok did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Other US politicians and government agencies, including Joe Biden's campaign and several military and government agencies, have issued bans on the usage of TikTok by their staff over similar concerns. However, experts have pointed out that the app collects user data in similar ways to US-based competitors like Facebook.

The orders also claim that both apps censor content that the Chinese government considers "politically sensitive,"  such as content about Hong Kong protests and its treatment of Muslim minority Uighurs.

Trump has ratcheted up his threats against TikTok in particular over the past few weeks, saying he would ban the app entirely if ByteDance didn't sell its stake in TikTok to an American company by September 15.

Microsoft said earlier this month that it was in talks to buy the stake, with the app reportedly being worth between $30 billion and $50 billion.

Microsoft declined to comment for this story.

Trump also promised to force any acquisition deal involving a US-based company to include a "very big proportion" of the sale price going to the US Treasury Department.

The president has the authority under a 1988 law to block foreign business deals pertaining to US companies if he considers the deals to be a national security threat, which he has used twice before to block deals involving firms from China and Singapore that were looking to acquire American companies.

Trump, who regularly blames the coronavirus pandemic on China and previously said his TikTok ban was meant to punish the country over its response, has also waged a years-long trade war with the country and previously penalized other Chinese tech companies including Huawei and ZTE.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

Rex Canale 2020-07-21
img
If anything, these new initiatives show that earlier efforts just weren’t enough.
Rex Canale 2019-11-15
img

If you sometimes find yourself happening upon a word you’ve no idea how to pronounce, a new feature announced by Google this week is here to help.

Baked right into its Search tool, all you do is type in, “Pronounce [word],” and then hit Go.

At the top of the results, you’ll see a little box with the word spelled out phonetically, and bold type indicating where to place the stress.

As with Google’s word definitions, you’ll also see a little speaker icon, which, when you tap on it, plays an audio clip of someone saying the word so you can hear exactly how to pronounce it.

If you tap on the “practice” button and speak the word into your microphone, Google’s speech recognition and machine learning software will assess your effort and respond immediately with some tips if it needs improvement.

“Studies have shown that practicing how to say a word can be helpful for remembering it, especially when you’re learning a new language,” Google’s Tal Snir wrote in a blog post announcing the new feature.

Rex Canale 2019-09-05
img

Facebook Dating is finally here.

The social network launched the feature today in the US and 19 other countries, after announcing it last year at its F8 developer conference.

The feature will be available to users above the age of 18 and, for those eligible, will appear as a new tab in the Facebook app.

Importantly, you’ll have a separate profile for Facebook Dating, meaning your, uh, activities won’t appear on your family’s newsfeed.

Once you sign up, you’ll get suggestions for matches as you do in any other dating app.

You can add friends or Instagram followers to the ‘Secret Crush’ list, and you’ll get a notification if they also add you to their list.