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Robert Sanchez 2021-07-28
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Marjorie Taylor Greene and Matt Gaetz held a press event while Capitol police officers testified before the House select committee.
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Robert Sanchez 2021-05-12
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Of all the new features that arrived in the next generation consoles (or are they current gen now?), Quick Resume is my favorite. And — WOULD YOU BELIEVE? — a recent update has made it better than ever. So, Quick Resume. This is a feature on the Xbox Series X and Series S (suck it, PS5 losers) that lets you switch between certain games instantly. Effectively, you can move from a FIFA battle straight into the middle of an Assassin’s Creed mission and back again almost instantly. I’ve written about my love for this feature before — and time hasn’t dulled the magic…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Xbox
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Robert Sanchez 2021-04-08
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Take the heat out of your firewall deployment

Webcast  If you’ve got an application which faces the web, no one would dispute that you should probably have a web application firewall sitting in front of it.…

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0
Robert Sanchez 2021-02-04
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Several women said Chinese men would rape and torture Uighur women every night in the camps even sometimes using electric sticks.
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0
Robert Sanchez 2021-07-26
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You may know it better as Teams. Giddy up

Column  You can spot a veteran of the Browser Wars a mile off. These fearsome conflicts, fought across the desktops of the world not 20 years ago, left deep scars. Just whisper "Best viewed in IE6" in any crowd of Generation 95'ers, and watch grown men and women weep like babies as their hands grasp for an invisible mouse to click on that long-gone Close Window.…

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0
Robert Sanchez 2021-04-25
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It's perfect for hard floors, but carries with a hefty price tag.
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0
Robert Sanchez 2021-04-02
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The Mate X2 is the perfect foldable, with a giant asterisk for the Western market.
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0
Robert Sanchez 2020-12-30
Amazon

Wondery, one of the last major independent podcast networks, is now owned by Amazon. The companies announced the deal today, ending speculation about who might eventually buy the network, which is most well-known for true crime podcasts like Dirty John. (Apple and Sony were also reported to have at least discussed a possible purchase.)

Amazon didn’t disclose the acquisition price, although earlier reports from Bloomberg and The Wall Street Journal suggested Wondery’s value was at least $300 million. Wondery is technically now part of Amazon Music, which launched podcast support in September this year.

The acquisition is a notable one, if only because it sets Amazon up to better compete against Spotify, which has been acquiring networks...

Continue reading…

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0
Robert Sanchez 2021-06-30
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Your PS Plus free games for July 2021 include A Plague Tale: Innocence, Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 and WWE 2K Battlegrounds.
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0
Robert Sanchez 2021-04-23
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Rare but potentially fatal blood clots have surfaced in 15 women who got Johnson & Johnson's vaccine. But COVID-19 is a much greater threat.
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0
Robert Sanchez 2021-03-30
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I shall call him Nemo and he shall be mine and he shall be my Nemo.
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0
Robert Sanchez 2020-12-23
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These disasters affected you if you inhaled the smoke, shivered in the polar vortex, took shelter from a storm, or sweat through a heat wave.
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Robert Sanchez 2021-06-03
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Joey revisits the house where he grew up for the first time. Sitting on the back doorstep remembering evenings out there as a child with his mum and sister Frankie.

He’s the the guy with an army of catchphrases and the world’s most colourful wardrobe – a lad who’s always up for a laugh. But in Grief And Me, which airs on June 3, we see another side to Joey Essex – one that’s been overwhelmed by the loss of his mum to suicide at the age of 10.

Now 30, the reality TV star opens up about the dark cloud that’s been hanging over his head since childhood – and the impact it’s had on his life choices.

No amount of fame or money has been able to heal the grief he’s kept buried inside for 20 years. But can anything? Here’s what we learned from the show. 

1. Joey has spent 20 years struggling with his mental health

The reality star speaks about how he’s been unable to come to terms with the death of his mum. Every time talks about her, or remembers her, he becomes overwhelmed with emotion. “The truth is, I’ve never been able to deal with it,” he says. “I’ve kept all this pain bottled up for years: getting panic attacks, feeling anxious, pushing people away. But I can’t go on like this.”

After the death of his mum, his life was “completely torn to pieces” – but he wasn’t able to process it. He was starting secondary school and felt unable to talk to other students or teachers about what he was going through.

The reality star vividly remembers having episodes, not long after her death, where he’d feel hot, race around, and act erratic. His dad would put him in a cold bath to cool – and calm – him down. Reflecting back, he acknowledges these were panic attacks.

2. Talking really does help when processing loss

Joey speaks to his sister Frankie and sees how differently she reacted after the death of their mum. She would speak about her to try and keep her memory alive, while Joey preferred to not talk at all. “I don’t talk to anyone about it,” the reality star says. “It’s all in here [points to his chest] hidden.”

In the documentary, he attends therapy with clinical psychologist Dr Stephen Blumenthal. Sessions start off shaky, where Joey is vocal about his trust issues and the fact he doesn’t feel like he can’t trust the therapist. 

But over time, they have a breakthrough and he realises talking helps him – although he can’t quite place how. As the show goes on, we see Joey talk more about his mum, and his memories of her. 

3. Building trust after trauma can be unimaginably hard

We find out Joey’s mistrust of people, like his therapist, extends to his romantic relationships, too. The star acknowledges he’d love to settle down and have a family, but he keeps pushing people away.

When he talks this through with his therapist, he realises this once again goes back to losing his mum. “She loved me, but she left me,” he says. “I always think to myself if she loved me that much, why would she leave me?

“Imagine if I was with someone, and I had kids with them, and I really did love that person – and then she left me. I wouldn’t know what to do.” Dr Blumenthal and Joey speak through the issue to try and get him to come to terms with it. 

4. Joey has struggled with his sense of identity over the years

The reality star spends a lot of time soul-searching in the documentary, acknowledging that most people know him as this larger-than-life character, but behind closed doors he’s battling all kinds of demons. We find out he’s quite lonely and he doesn’t really know who he is.

“I think the whole persona he’s used up until now means that he doesn’t have to give her [his mum] up, he’s always her little boy,” says Dr Blumenthal.

5. Sometimes, with grief, you have to face the memories

Parts of the show see Joey retrace his steps – looking at old photos of his mum, talking about her with his sister and nan, and visiting the house where he grew up in Bermondsey. “Running away from memories hasn’t done me any favours at all,” says the star, who has one photo of his mum on display in his house. 

Dr Blumenthal notes that trauma buries people’s memories and stops them from being able to look at photos or films. Retrieving those memories – and the thoughts and emotions associated with those memories – can be really difficult. 

While initially Joey is barely able to think about or talk about his mum, over time he realises that reflecting back on some of the happier times isn’t as bad as he’d imagined – in fact, it’s quite cathartic.

Joey Essex: Grief and Me airs Thursday June 3, available on BBC Three from 6am, BBC One from 9pm, and on iPlayer.

Useful websites and helplines

Mind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.

Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).

CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.

The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected]

Rethink Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0808 801 0525 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.

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Robert Sanchez 2021-04-13
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Don't settle for this one.
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Robert Sanchez 2021-02-05
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I tried calling all 27 countries for some help with Acrobat but their mums said they were out

Something for the Weekend, Sir?  I have never indecently exposed myself. On the contrary, I do it rather well.…

collect
0
Robert Sanchez 2020-10-23
img
Microsoft is really pushing its Xbox game streaming, both with “local” Remote Play as well as cloud gaming via Xbox Game Pass Ultimate, previously known as Project xCloud. But while the likes of Google’s Stadia initially aimed from TVs via the Chromecast, Xbox cloud gaming prioritized a more mobile experience. Gaming on smartphones, however, doesn’t always have the same feel, … Continue reading
collect
0
Robert Sanchez 2021-07-28
img
Marjorie Taylor Greene and Matt Gaetz held a press event while Capitol police officers testified before the House select committee.
Robert Sanchez 2021-06-30
img
Your PS Plus free games for July 2021 include A Plague Tale: Innocence, Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 and WWE 2K Battlegrounds.
Robert Sanchez 2021-05-12
img

Of all the new features that arrived in the next generation consoles (or are they current gen now?), Quick Resume is my favorite. And — WOULD YOU BELIEVE? — a recent update has made it better than ever. So, Quick Resume. This is a feature on the Xbox Series X and Series S (suck it, PS5 losers) that lets you switch between certain games instantly. Effectively, you can move from a FIFA battle straight into the middle of an Assassin’s Creed mission and back again almost instantly. I’ve written about my love for this feature before — and time hasn’t dulled the magic…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Xbox
Robert Sanchez 2021-04-23
img
Rare but potentially fatal blood clots have surfaced in 15 women who got Johnson & Johnson's vaccine. But COVID-19 is a much greater threat.
Robert Sanchez 2021-04-08
img

Take the heat out of your firewall deployment

Webcast  If you’ve got an application which faces the web, no one would dispute that you should probably have a web application firewall sitting in front of it.…

Robert Sanchez 2021-03-30
img
I shall call him Nemo and he shall be mine and he shall be my Nemo.
Robert Sanchez 2021-02-04
img
Several women said Chinese men would rape and torture Uighur women every night in the camps even sometimes using electric sticks.
Robert Sanchez 2020-12-23
img
These disasters affected you if you inhaled the smoke, shivered in the polar vortex, took shelter from a storm, or sweat through a heat wave.
Robert Sanchez 2021-07-26
img

You may know it better as Teams. Giddy up

Column  You can spot a veteran of the Browser Wars a mile off. These fearsome conflicts, fought across the desktops of the world not 20 years ago, left deep scars. Just whisper "Best viewed in IE6" in any crowd of Generation 95'ers, and watch grown men and women weep like babies as their hands grasp for an invisible mouse to click on that long-gone Close Window.…

Robert Sanchez 2021-06-03
img
Joey revisits the house where he grew up for the first time. Sitting on the back doorstep remembering evenings out there as a child with his mum and sister Frankie.

He’s the the guy with an army of catchphrases and the world’s most colourful wardrobe – a lad who’s always up for a laugh. But in Grief And Me, which airs on June 3, we see another side to Joey Essex – one that’s been overwhelmed by the loss of his mum to suicide at the age of 10.

Now 30, the reality TV star opens up about the dark cloud that’s been hanging over his head since childhood – and the impact it’s had on his life choices.

No amount of fame or money has been able to heal the grief he’s kept buried inside for 20 years. But can anything? Here’s what we learned from the show. 

1. Joey has spent 20 years struggling with his mental health

The reality star speaks about how he’s been unable to come to terms with the death of his mum. Every time talks about her, or remembers her, he becomes overwhelmed with emotion. “The truth is, I’ve never been able to deal with it,” he says. “I’ve kept all this pain bottled up for years: getting panic attacks, feeling anxious, pushing people away. But I can’t go on like this.”

After the death of his mum, his life was “completely torn to pieces” – but he wasn’t able to process it. He was starting secondary school and felt unable to talk to other students or teachers about what he was going through.

The reality star vividly remembers having episodes, not long after her death, where he’d feel hot, race around, and act erratic. His dad would put him in a cold bath to cool – and calm – him down. Reflecting back, he acknowledges these were panic attacks.

2. Talking really does help when processing loss

Joey speaks to his sister Frankie and sees how differently she reacted after the death of their mum. She would speak about her to try and keep her memory alive, while Joey preferred to not talk at all. “I don’t talk to anyone about it,” the reality star says. “It’s all in here [points to his chest] hidden.”

In the documentary, he attends therapy with clinical psychologist Dr Stephen Blumenthal. Sessions start off shaky, where Joey is vocal about his trust issues and the fact he doesn’t feel like he can’t trust the therapist. 

But over time, they have a breakthrough and he realises talking helps him – although he can’t quite place how. As the show goes on, we see Joey talk more about his mum, and his memories of her. 

3. Building trust after trauma can be unimaginably hard

We find out Joey’s mistrust of people, like his therapist, extends to his romantic relationships, too. The star acknowledges he’d love to settle down and have a family, but he keeps pushing people away.

When he talks this through with his therapist, he realises this once again goes back to losing his mum. “She loved me, but she left me,” he says. “I always think to myself if she loved me that much, why would she leave me?

“Imagine if I was with someone, and I had kids with them, and I really did love that person – and then she left me. I wouldn’t know what to do.” Dr Blumenthal and Joey speak through the issue to try and get him to come to terms with it. 

4. Joey has struggled with his sense of identity over the years

The reality star spends a lot of time soul-searching in the documentary, acknowledging that most people know him as this larger-than-life character, but behind closed doors he’s battling all kinds of demons. We find out he’s quite lonely and he doesn’t really know who he is.

“I think the whole persona he’s used up until now means that he doesn’t have to give her [his mum] up, he’s always her little boy,” says Dr Blumenthal.

5. Sometimes, with grief, you have to face the memories

Parts of the show see Joey retrace his steps – looking at old photos of his mum, talking about her with his sister and nan, and visiting the house where he grew up in Bermondsey. “Running away from memories hasn’t done me any favours at all,” says the star, who has one photo of his mum on display in his house. 

Dr Blumenthal notes that trauma buries people’s memories and stops them from being able to look at photos or films. Retrieving those memories – and the thoughts and emotions associated with those memories – can be really difficult. 

While initially Joey is barely able to think about or talk about his mum, over time he realises that reflecting back on some of the happier times isn’t as bad as he’d imagined – in fact, it’s quite cathartic.

Joey Essex: Grief and Me airs Thursday June 3, available on BBC Three from 6am, BBC One from 9pm, and on iPlayer.

Useful websites and helplines

Mind, open Monday to Friday, 9am-6pm on 0300 123 3393.

Samaritans offers a listening service which is open 24 hours a day, on 116 123 (UK and ROI - this number is FREE to call and will not appear on your phone bill).

CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) offer a helpline open 5pm-midnight, 365 days a year, on 0800 58 58 58, and a webchat service.

The Mix is a free support service for people under 25. Call 0808 808 4994 or email [email protected]

Rethink Mental Illness offers practical help through its advice line which can be reached on 0808 801 0525 (Monday to Friday 10am-4pm). More info can be found on rethink.org.

Robert Sanchez 2021-04-25
img
It's perfect for hard floors, but carries with a hefty price tag.
Robert Sanchez 2021-04-13
img
Don't settle for this one.
Robert Sanchez 2021-04-02
img
The Mate X2 is the perfect foldable, with a giant asterisk for the Western market.
Robert Sanchez 2021-02-05
img

I tried calling all 27 countries for some help with Acrobat but their mums said they were out

Something for the Weekend, Sir?  I have never indecently exposed myself. On the contrary, I do it rather well.…

Robert Sanchez 2020-12-30
Amazon

Wondery, one of the last major independent podcast networks, is now owned by Amazon. The companies announced the deal today, ending speculation about who might eventually buy the network, which is most well-known for true crime podcasts like Dirty John. (Apple and Sony were also reported to have at least discussed a possible purchase.)

Amazon didn’t disclose the acquisition price, although earlier reports from Bloomberg and The Wall Street Journal suggested Wondery’s value was at least $300 million. Wondery is technically now part of Amazon Music, which launched podcast support in September this year.

The acquisition is a notable one, if only because it sets Amazon up to better compete against Spotify, which has been acquiring networks...

Continue reading…

Robert Sanchez 2020-10-23
img
Microsoft is really pushing its Xbox game streaming, both with “local” Remote Play as well as cloud gaming via Xbox Game Pass Ultimate, previously known as Project xCloud. But while the likes of Google’s Stadia initially aimed from TVs via the Chromecast, Xbox cloud gaming prioritized a more mobile experience. Gaming on smartphones, however, doesn’t always have the same feel, … Continue reading