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Sandra Wilson 2021-06-23
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A new study has found a link between cannabis product use and issues related to suicide, including thinking about and attempting to commit suicide. The research focused specifically on young users below the age of 35, noting that though this link was found, the findings don’t necessarily mean that cannabis use is the cause of the observed association. The research … Continue reading
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Sandra Wilson 2020-10-30
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Lips Neon Signs Thin Line Seamless Pattern Background Include of Lip, Kiss and Mouth. Vector illustration of Icons

You’re reading Sex Diaries, a HuffPost UK Personal series about how we are (or aren’t) having sex. To share your story, get in touch on [email protected]

Nigerians are good at a lot of things, and pretence is definitely one of them. Whether it’s pretending to like people we don’t like, or pretending to not like people we like so it doesn’t get in their heads, we pretend a lot. 

But the most amazing aspect of this pretentiousness is how we love to claim we don’t have sex. Which is funny because, according to the Society for Family Health Nigeria, we use about 400 million condoms yearly. If we are not having sex, who is using the condoms?

When it comes to those of us who do admit that people have sex, there’s a habit of slut-shaming that is downright outrageous. For some reason, sex between two people is treated like only the woman was involved in it. There is still the conscious or subconscious belief that, somehow, a woman’s worth is tied to her vagina, and that her marginal utility begins to reduce once she begins to have sex. And any woman who enjoys sex? That’s a slut!

Slut-shaming here is so commonplace it’s almost the norm. You start experiencing it once you hit puberty – sometimes even before. One of the most infuriating things about it is the sheer audacity of the people who engage in it. More times than I can remember, I have been slut-shamed for merely walking on the road or refusing to give out my phone number. It’s sick. Whether I politely decline or rudely ignore them, I’m still going to be called a slut. 

The openly sexual male is a player, while the openly sexual female is indecent and a prostitute.

More often than not, this is usually the first time a growing girl experiences it. It gets confusing. Do I give out my number so I can have some peace? What happens when I pass this route again? As you grow up and learn how to deal with that, you start facing society members who believe you slept your way to every good place you’re in. An expensive phone? You fucked for it. A promotion? You fucked for it. A car? You fucked for it. Seen with a rich man? He’s definitely your sugar daddy.

The slut-shaming isn’t just external either. It happens internally as well. Family, friends, colleagues say stuff about you. I was once called a prostitute by a close relative because I opened a bank account without parental consent. I was called a “hoe” and worse by a considerable number of people – some of whom were supposed to be my friends – because of sex between some dude who lied and me. He did the lying, but I got the smoke.

There’s also the issue of the very people you’re sleeping with slut-shaming you. I mean, we are together but somehow you’re the stud and I’m the slut? Incredible. Nothing seems to stop your sexual partner from slut-shaming you for the sex you are (or were) having. Guys get out of relationships and begin to call their exes all sorts. Sometimes, they go as far as commodifying you and your body parts, to the adulation of other members of society. Then you begin to wonder if you had the sex in question alone.

People try to pass slut-shaming off as a joke but the reality is that it sucks big time. Nobody wants to be insulted for simply choosing to live free.

You see, the openly sexual male is a player, while the openly sexual female is indecent and a prostitute. I love adult jokes – I crack a ton of funny ones myself. But someone called my attention to it saying it was making people around think of me as loose. Can’t lie, I felt rather disappointed in everyone involved. I compared myself to a man in the same circle – If my jokes were dirty, his were downright filthy. However, he was funny and I was slutty? I keep my jokes to myself now. These people are clearly unworthy of such premium content.

Sometimes I deliberately do more of what I was doing just to spite the shamer. Sex? I’ll have more of it. Dirty jokes? I’ll crack dirtier ones. Short skirt? The next one I’ll wear will be shorter – with a thigh slit. I don’t think the comments made by the slut-shaming blockheads should weigh anyone down and stop them from enjoying themselves. I mean, we only live once, don’t we? If we live our lives always keeping what people will say in mind, we will simply not live for us; we’ll live for them.

But I understand that not everyone has thick skin. Sometimes, people try to pass slut-shaming off as a joke but the reality is that it sucks big time. Nobody wants to be insulted for simply choosing to live free. I don’t see slut-shaming as a hurdle. It’s more like a speed breaker – sometimes, the comments might slow me down, sometimes I just ignore them and speed along and sometimes, I don’t even see them and I just speed through. Bumpy, but we move.

Tobi Adebanjo is a freelance writer and student

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

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Sandra Wilson 2020-07-30
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Apple Iphone 11

  • Apple said it expects supply of its next iPhone to be available "a few weeks later" compared to last year's iPhone launch.
  • The comments come as reports have suggested the next-generation iPhone may be delayed because of supply chain issues stemming from the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Apple made the comments in the context of giving investors some insight into what it expects for the next quarter since it didn't issue guidance.
  • Apple reported growth across all product segments, including the iPhone, in its fiscal third-quarter earnings report. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Apple said the launch of its anticipated 5G iPhone will likely be delayed a few weeks as the company's supply chain recovers from the coronavirus pandemic. 

The company did not provide revenue guidance for its fiscal fourth quarter because of uncertainty stemming from COVID-19. But during its fiscal third-quarter earnings call, the company did provide some insight into what it's expecting across its biggest product segments for the September quarter.

When discussing the iPhone, Apple said that although it started selling new iPhones in late September last year, it expects "supply to be available a few weeks later."

"This year the supply of the new product will be a few weeks later than that," Luca Maestri, Apple's senior vice president and chief financial officer, said on the company's earnings call. 

It's far from being the first indication that Apple's next iPhone could see a delayed launch. Bloomberg's Mark Gurman reported back in April that at least some versions of the new iPhone could launch a few weeks later than usual, noting that they would still likely debut in the fall time frame. Analysts from J.P. Morgan previously suggested that the next iPhone could be delayed by one or two months.

It also wouldn't be the first time that Apple launched an iPhone later than its typical September window. In 2018, for example, it began selling the iPhone XR in October, while the iPhone X launched in November 2017.

Apple's next iPhone, expected to be called the iPhone 12, is rumored to be its first 5G iPhone. Other than 5G connectivity, reports suggest it will come with a fresh design in new screen sizes. It may also come with a LiDAR sensor for enabling better augmented reality performance, much like the most recent iPad Pro.

The comments came after Apple reported a blowout earnings report that saw growth across all product segments — including the iPhone, which had suffered multiple quarters of decline. Apple attributed the iPhone's growth to the new iPhone SE it launched in April, some of the reopenings that took place in May and June, and the popularity of last year's iPhone 11. 

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

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Sandra Wilson 2019-09-09
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Facebook has turned off automatic facial recognition for its users and the US Department of Defense wants to hire an ethicist to, you know, develop AI for good, of course.

AI engineers from industry and academia are collaborating to launch a challenge to advance technology to detect fake visual content manipulated by machine learning algorithms.

The contest, known as the Deepfake Detection Challenge (DFDC), is spearheaded by a long list of names, including: Facebook, the San Francisco based nonprofit the Partnership on AI, Microsoft, as well researchers from Cornell Tech, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Oxford, University of California, Berkeley, University of Maryland, College Park, and University at Albany-SUNY.

Doctored videos of actors and actresses may seem innocuous - check out the Chinese app Zao - but no one’s laughing much when it comes to world leaders or fake pornography.

The fear of revenge porn or rise of disinformation is real.

So, Facebook has decided to throw $10m (or about half a day's profit) at the problem.

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Sandra Wilson 2021-05-21
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And I'm here for it. This is now one of the cheapest ways to enjoy offline Spotify on the go.
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Sandra Wilson 2020-09-25
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"I don't think there's anything sexy about" COVID, Yandy's vice president of merchandising told Business Insider.
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Sandra Wilson 2020-07-18
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On 18 July 2000, the first episode of Big Brother debuted on Channel 4. Ten complete strangers agreed to live together under constant surveillance, in a bid to last as long in the infamous house as possible and bag themselves £70,000.

What followed was a game-changing TV phenomenon.

Big Brother’s unique premise meant there was already some intrigue around its launch, but no one in those early days could have predicted how the show would eventually change not just the TV industry, but the face of celebrity culture in just a few short years.

Before long, millions were tuning in nightly, and Big Brother swiftly became an instant – if temporary – fame machine, with many hopefuls seeing the show as an opportunity to snatch those all-alluring 15 minutes of fame.

Big Brother’s eventual first winner Craig Phillips had a rather different motivation for signing up, though. 

Craig in Big Brother's first ever Diary Room

Craig became aware of Big Brother after watching a documentary about the original Dutch version of the show. At that time, he was fundraising for Joanne Harris, a family friend with Down’s syndrome, who needed money to pay for a heart and lung transplant.

“I had no ambition to be famous in any way,” he tells HuffPost UK, on Big Brother’s 20th anniversary.

“But I thought, ‘If I get on this programme and win, I’ll get £70,000. It sounds easy enough, all I’ve got to do is live with 10 other people’. And I was wrong – it wasn’t easy, that’s for sure.”

I thought, 'no one's heard of Big Brother, no one's going to watch it, so who cares?'

He continues: “I didn’t go on for any other reason, I just thought it would be a quick and easy way to win a lot of money. I was set on trying to get a quarter of a million pounds for Joanne Harris. I just thought, ‘no one’s heard of Big Brother, no one’s going to watch it, so who cares?’.”

As it turns out, Craig was wrong on that front, too. By the first eviction, the show was being watched by 3.4 million people, a figure which had shot up to an estimated 10 million by the time the live final came seven weeks later.

Obviously, with no contact whatsoever with the outside world, the original housemates had no idea just how popular the show was becoming, which potentially explains one of Big Brother’s earliest outrageous moments, in which several of the housemates – including Craig – stripped off, covered themselves in wet clay and painted the living room with their bodies.

 

Recalling of the attention-grabbing incident, Craig says: “We were getting a bit bored in there, and it was only the first week. We were just having a laugh, we never even thought it would get put out to the public.

“We just thought ‘if they’re editing bits out, they’re gonna edit in the actual pottery’ – not necessarily thinking they’d be showing us naked and painting each other’s bodies with clay, then pressing ourselves against the walls.

“No one had ever seen it, so we were all a bit naive going into it. Not that I’m, making excuses, and I’m certainly not sorry I did it – it was just a bit of fun. It was a bit like when students all get in their halls of residence and they’re all taking the piss a bit.”

Still, uninhibited though he and his housemates may have been, Craig says he “never really got used to” being on camera for every minute of the day.

Whenever people used to say 'I forgot the cameras were there'... that's a load of bollocks.

“I wouldn’t say you ever switch off from the cameras. You see them, you hear them, and you’re reminded by Big Brother that you’re being filmed” he remembers.

You’re aware the cameras are in the bedroom, they’re over the top of your head when you’re sitting on the toilet… sometimes when we were lying in the bedroom or the conversation dropped, we’d hear camera-men pulling cables or changing the lenses or dropping things behind the mirrors, and the odd cough here and there. And we were so isolated in there, it was quite refreshing to hear other people.

“So whenever people used to say ‘I forgot the cameras were there, I didn’t mean to do that, I didn’t mean to say that’, that’s a load of bollocks, to be honest. You do know they’re there, you just cope with it. For me, I just tried to ignore them, get on with it, and try not to behave too stupidly.”

Craig Phillips on This Morning in 2019

Craig was also at the centre of what was undoubtedly the series’ most headline-grabbing moment, which saw contestant Nicholas “Nasty Nick” Bateman ousted for cheating.

In the lead-up to the incident, Viewers had already seen Nick making up lies to keep his fellow housemates on his side (including the death of a fiancée), as well as trying to influence the nomination process, which went directly against Big Brother’s rules.

In an episode that was recently revisited as part of the celebratory Big Brother’s Best Shows Ever series, Craig spoke to the rest of the housemates individually about Nick’s behaviour, before confronting him as a group.

 

Craig admits he had never actually seen the episode in question, aside from a few clips, until E4 repeated it in 2020, noting: “It was a little bit cringe-y, but I did kind of get a clearer insight into how much of a cheat and a liar Nasty Nick was. Without seeing [the episode]… I underestimated how blatant he was.

“So that was a bit of a surprise... quite an upsetting and disappointing surprise for me, but certainly interesting.”

He recalls: “[When we confronted him], he tried to put up a bit of an argument. We’d have respected him a bit more if he’d just held his hands up and said ‘I’ve been an idiot, this is what I’ve done’, [but] he left it until we – I’m not saying dragged it out of him – but we had to basically bring him evidence and confront him.”

I even went to Big Brother at one point and said, ‘If Nick is not kicked out, I’m going home'.

At the time, many viewers noticed that Craig took the Nick situation more seriously than many of the other housemates, but as he points out: “I’d gone in there to win this money for this young lady and all of a sudden, I’m up against a cheat. And I only wanted to play fairly, basically.

“So, for me, I was starting to get a bit wound up…  I think I even went to Big Brother at one point and said, ‘if Nick doesn’t go, if he’s not kicked out, I’m going home. I’m not staying in a programme if it’s not going to be fair’.”

In the end, Nick’s behaviour led to him being shown the door, but even though it was the outcome Craig wanted, he recalls there being a sombre mood when his housemate was ejected.

“That was quite a morbid day, saying goodbye to him,” Craig reveals. “We did feel sorry for him, because we were concerned that if the programme had got big, how would he be received outside? It was a morbid day, not a nice afternoon. It was like a funeral feeling.

“Little did I know, it was enhancing my profile, and making people warm to me. And that could be the reason I went on to win, but honestly I don’t know.”

Craig confronts Nick in the Big Brother house

Despite being nominated for eviction more times than any of his housemates (including the five consecutive weeks leading up to the final), as time rolled on, the thought began to occur to Craig that the coveted £70K could soon be his.

“We never knew how we were getting perceived outside, he says. “But it got to about two weeks before the end, and I suddenly thought ‘you know what, I’ve won this’.

“I’d been up against who I thought were the tough competitors, and they were all kicked out. And I woke up one morning – I don’t want to sound cocky, but it was a nice feeling, two weeks left, and all the big boys have been kicked out, and I had a sudden confident feeling that I could win.” 

Of course, the feeling was right. The first ever celebratory Big Brother final was a fitting end to what had been a huge series, and it was difficult not to feel excited on Craig’s behalf as Davina McCall led him out of the house to a fireworks display in his honour – and an extra £70,000 in his bank account.

As it turned out, though, Craig’s buzz on the night was cut short very quickly.

Craig with fellow Big Brother finalists, Darren and Anna

“It was a big celebration for everybody else on the last night, but not for me, that’s for sure,” Craig recalls. “What you saw on television, me coming out of the house, meeting Jo, and seeing my family... then getting up on stage with all the other Big Brother housemates and the fireworks – that, for me, only lasted five minutes.

“The moment the cameras stopped, I was rushed away by bodyguards. Literally dragged off, put into a vehicle, police escort, whisked away to a big hotel. And it was scary, it was like I was being kidnapped… it was all rush-rush, not many people were talking to me or explaining to me what was happening and why.

“All I wanted to do was see my friends and family, you know? I’d been cooped up for 64 days, I wanted out, I wanted to have a party.” 

Instead, he was sat down with Big Brother’s psychiatrists, who calmly tried to explain how big the show had become during his time away from the outside world and, as Craig puts it, “how I was going to have to adapt to things”.

It was a big celebration for everybody else on the last night, but not for me, that’s for sure.

“It was quite a nerve-racking thing, when you’ve got a psychiatrist telling you that you’ll be on the front page of every national newspaper, and every radio station and every news bulletin was talking about you,” Craig says. ”[The psychiatrist]’s words were ‘you’ll be the most talked-about person in Britain’.

“It’s scary, you know, I can recall hearing what he was saying to me, but I wasn’t fully digesting it. You try to process that in your mind, that all of a sudden the whole country knows your name, but where do you go from there? What do you do? It’s quite a scary thing to digest. So I’ve got to say that wasn’t the best night.”

He adds: “I had a briefing with press officers and had people telling me security would be with me 24 hours a day, and they’d be chaperoning me around, that I couldn’t go home [because] the press would be chasing us. And how do you deal with that?” 

Craig celebrates his win with Big Brother host Davina McCall

After four hours, in the early hours of the morning, Craig was allowed a visit from his cousin, Steve, which is the moment he was given his first opportunity to really celebrate.

When Steve arrived, the agents and the security guards were like please don’t try and leave the building or anything, if you want anything come to the door and the security can relay it to whoever’,” he says.

“We were in this big massive suite, two or three thousand pound suite, with this massive bed in the middle. And basically, you know that scene in Rocky III where Rocky and Apollo are on the beach? It was a little bit like that, two grown men bouncing up and down on the bed and hugging each other, and screaming and shouting.

“And then, we had the bodyguards knocking at the door – and we thought we were going to get told off for making too much noise, but they just brought in two lovely steaks and a few bottles of champagne and beers and things like that. So we enjoyed a lovely meal, at about four o’clock in the morning.”

The psychiatrist's words were ‘you’ll be the most talked-about person in Britain'. What would you do if someone told you that?

Even that wasn’t to last, though, and before long Craig was given some clothes to change into and told he had to head back to the Big Brother house for his first press conference.

He jokes: “I was like ‘oh shit, I haven’t had any sleep yet’. And we’d been drinking! From that day, my life changed, and that was basically my life for the next 97 days – security picking me up early in the morning, taking me everywhere I needed to be, chaperoning me around. Chaperones, press officers, stylists – it was a bit of an entourage that travelled around.”

Although Craig has made the most of his time in the spotlight, presenting numerous DIY and home makeover shows in the last 20 years, he maintains that fame was not something he ever sought out.

In fact, had he not made it onto the first series of Big Brother, he admits he probably wouldn’t have tried out for any future years, because of how famous the contestants ended up becoming. 

Craig posing with Victoria Beckham at the Elle Style Awards, months after his win

“When I went on Big Brother, I didn’t want to work on TV, I didn’t want to be known or recognised or famous in any way, it just kind of turned out that way for me really,” he says.

“When you see [later] series, they knew they were going to be household names when they came out. So I probably wouldn’t have applied, I’d have viewed it a little bit differently.

“And people say to me now, ‘if you didn’t want to be famous, why did you go on that programme?’ But I didn’t know we were going to be famous after going on that programme. I went on to win the money!”

Because of the permanence of celebrity news stories in 2020, and the rise of social media, Craig admits that he thinks the current crop of reality stars, made famous on shows like Love Island, have a tougher time than the early stars of Big Brother.

The old saying was ‘news today is chip paper tomorrow’, whereas nowadays it’s not, is it?

“In those days, the old saying was ‘news today is chip paper tomorrow’, whereas nowadays it’s not, is it?” Craig explains. “News today, it’s there forever, because everything ends up online somewhere down the line, where it can be regurgitated at any time.

“It’s very different with reality personalities nowadays. In the middle of their shows, they’re racing for their million followers on Instagram, and they’re getting abuse. They’re getting the followers – what they want – but it’s a double-edged sword, they’re getting the problems that come with it. So, I think the pressure is on them a little bit more now.”

Still, although he may be a reluctant celebrity, it’s clear that being part of a show that was “the birth of reality TV” is something he’s proud of.

“There’s never been another format that’s done the track record that Big Brother has. Its legacy will be remembered as the pioneers of reality TV, the first ones to make relative nobodies into super-famous people,” he says.

“The whole country has just experienced major lockdown for the first time in their lives – they’ve had a little taste of what we went through, so I could see it coming back now. And I think it would go down a treat.”

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Sandra Wilson 2019-08-29
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Maryland's law against distributing child pornography applies even when the person distributing a pornographic video is the video's minor subject, Maryland's highest court ruled on Wednesday in a 6-1 vote.

in court documents, was 16 years old when she performed oral sex on an unidentified male.

The act was captured on video—he appears to have been holding the camera—and S.K.

shared the video with two friends via a text message.

She eventually became estranged from one of the friends, a 17-year-old boy, and he showed the video to a police officer at the school.

Indiana Supreme Court: Sex with minors is OK, but it’s illegal to sext them

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Sandra Wilson 2021-04-28
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The streaming platform has a new batch of streamers making money from viewers.
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Sandra Wilson 2020-09-02
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One of Britain’s biggest trade unions is “institutionally sexist”, a damning independent report has found.

The GMB union, whose general secretary Tim Roache suddenly quit this year amid allegations of misconduct, needs “fundamental change” the probe by barrister Karon Monaghan QC concluded.

“Bullying, misogyny, cronyism and sexual harassment are endemic within the GMB,” the report said.

“The culture in the GMB is one of heavy drinking and late night socialising, salacious gossip and a lack of professionalism.”

The GMB has more than 600,000 members across many job sectors, including NHS staff, ambulance drivers, school cleaners, council staff, security staff and a range of manufacturing workers. 

The report - which covered the period 2010 to 2020 and interviewed three former general secretaries - added: “The GMB’s policies and practices are not sufficiently clear or robust to deal with sexual harassment among employees or members.

“The GMB is institutionally sexist. The general secretaries and all regional secretaries are, and always have been, men. Women are underrepresented throughout the GMB’s ranks.”

Monaghan was asked in May to conduct an investigation into a “number of very serious allegations made by way of anonymous correspondence”.

Former general secretary Tim Roache

An unsigned letter circulated to senior members of the union made a string of misconduct allegations against Roache.

The union opted to order an inquiry not into the specific allegations but into the wider culture within its ranks.

The final report - which was based on 150 different submissions and interviews with 39 individuals - is withering in is assessment of the deep problems that affect the union at all levels.

Even though more than half of its members are women, “job segregration” along gender lines means the top officer posts are held by men. Women are instead sidelined in ‘staff’ roles such as “secretarial, finance management, reception, admin, cleaners”.

Monaghan concluded there was “stereotyping around male and female roles”.“When women do succeed in achieving more senior
roles, it is often said that they have ‘slept their way to the top’,” she wrote.

Local branches of the union often deter women because their meetings are held in the pub after work. “They are typically run, I was told, by ‘geezers’ and
much like other aspects of the regions, on a ‘job for the boys’ basis,” the report says.

In one of the most damning sections of the report, it found that sexual harassment was “common in the GMB” and was regular at its booze-fuelled annual Congress. There was a “predatory attitude” towards women.

“Examples of sexual harassment I heard about included touching hair, leering, commenting on body shape and clothes, placing hands around a woman’s waist, staring at a woman’s breasts or “tits”, propositioning young women, “sloppy kisses”, “lip kisses”, “sticking a tongue” in a woman’s ear, touching of knees, bottoms and hips, hugs, and slapping of a backside.

 

“Sometimes sexual harassment is used as a form of bullying with examples given to me of men deliberately sexually harassing women in public to humiliate and embarrass them. I have also heard of more serious sexual assaults. I was told by one witness that ’it is simply expected that you’ll have to suffer from being groped at events.”

The report calls for strong disciplinary action against sexual harassers and the break up of the current powers of the general secretary and regional secretaries who effectively run the union, with ‘lay’ members instead given much more oversight and control.

The human resources department, which has just two members, should be hugely expanded and equalities put at the heart of the structure and rules of the union. Its bullying and harassment policies should be totally overhauled and strengthened, Monaghan said.

She also concluded: “I am satisfied that the GMB is not a comfortable place to be for many employees and members from Black and minority ethnic groups.”

Barbara Plant, national president of the GMB, had supported the inquiry to ensure that the “safety of our people, particularly women” was paramount.

Plant said on Wednesday that the union’s Central Executive Council would now act on the recommendations to deliver “transformational change”.

“Karon’s report makes sad and difficult reading.  On behalf of GMB, I apologise to all those who have experienced sexual harassment or bullying within the union.

“It’s clear that real and lasting change is needed for us to become a safe and inclusive place for all.”

Among submissions to the inquiry was one from a Labour MP which claimed the union had “a real cultural issue with sexual harassment which went from the top to the bottom of the organisation.”

Roache stepped down in April after 40 years at the GMB, citing chronic fatigue syndrome as the reason for his departure. But his resignation, just months after he was reelected to his post in November, sparked claims he was forced out.

The move led to bitter infighting, with claim and counter-claim of bullying and misconduct.

Roache was first elected in 2015, when he succeeded Sir Paul Kenny as the union’s chief.

More than 50 Labour MPs are members of the union and its representatives play a key role on its ruling National Executive Committee.

One Labour MP, who is a member of the union, was scathing. They told HuffPost UK that the report confirmed that “GMB is a union controlled by the male, pale and sometimes stale”.

“At GMB the Regional Secretaries are seen as untouchable, not to be challenged and they’re all men. If they don’t want any change it never happens. 

“This whole culture has been built up over decades – unaccountable power, big pay offs for mates even if they’ve completely failed in their jobs, bullying of anyone who descents or questions the wisdom of the regions, the denigration of women who are seen to step out of line and jobs for the boys.”

It backed Lisa Nandy in the recent Labour leadership contest and Roache was seen as critical of Jeremy Corbyn during his reign.

John Phillips, GMB regional secretary for Wales and South West, has been appointed the union’s acting general secretary until a replacement for Roache is elected.

The union will next consider a timetable for the election to start possibly within weeks, but it is unlikely to see a new boss in place until next spring.

The race is expected to turn into a contest between Scottish regional secretary Gary Smith and national secretary Rehana Azam.

Azam tweeted her reaction to the report.

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Sandra Wilson 2020-07-10
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From flying a plane to restoring art, YouTubers can truly teach you anything. Here are the best shows that have sparked our curiosity during quarantine.
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Sandra Wilson 2019-08-20
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True wireless headphones are all the rage, but until now they've all been in-ear models that nestle inside your ear and are relatively compact.

They also convert into a tiny portable Bluetooth speaker and have a language translation mode, but their true wireless nature is what makes them unique.

I can't say I'm in a rush to go out and buy a pair for $399 -- yes, that's a tad pricey -- but they do have some intriguing elements.

The headphones are only available on the company's website and international prices don't appear to be available, but the $399 converts to about £330 or AU$590.

For starters, they sound decent.

They also seem well engineered, with responsive touch controls and a nice matte black finish.

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Sandra Wilson 2021-03-11
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Crypto whiz Justin Sun bought a piece of digital art from artist Beeple for a record $69.3 million at a Christie's auction on Thursday.
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Sandra Wilson 2020-08-21
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With six pistols to choose from, each with its own feel and benefits, which is best with the Akimbo perk?
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Sandra Wilson 2019-10-17
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The multiverse is on the brink of war, with the Third Reich yearning to invade and dominate all realities.

But in the new trailer for the last season of Amazon Prime’s The Man in the High Castle, the rebels who’ve been fighting this alt-history world aren’t going down without a last fight.

The first trailer has arrived for the fourth and final season of The Man in the High Castle, which returns to Amazon Prime next month.

Last season ended on a cliffhanger, with John Smith (Rufus Sewell) on the verge of a major promotion and Julia Crain (Alexa Davalos) tapping into her ability to travel between worlds.

Now, Julia is in our reality, a world where the Germans and Japanese hadn’t invaded the United States, and she becomes more determined than ever to save her own world from the Third Reich.

Meanwhile, John Smith has assumed more control over the Nazis and is moving forward with plans to invade other realities, as his wife Helen (Chelah Horsdal) starts to question his actions.

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Sandra Wilson 2019-08-14

The company is planning an update that’ll hopefully remedy the situation and prevent it from happening again, but that change isn’t coming until next month.

One owner’s oven turned on around 2:30AM and broiled at 400 degrees for hours while he slept, and he only noticed when he woke up four hours later.

Nest cam footage captured the exact moment it turned on: the oven illuminates his dark, empty kitchen in a truly Black Mirror-like recording.

It’s billed as “seven appliances in one”: an air fryer, dehydrator, slow cooker, broiler, toaster, warming drawer, and convection countertop oven.

It also pairs with an app that allows people to choose their temperature and cooking settings, as well as live stream their food as it cooks thanks to the built-in camera.

However, with that connected promise comes a risk: the oven is always available through the tap of an app, which can be both good and bad.

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Sandra Wilson 2021-06-23
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A new study has found a link between cannabis product use and issues related to suicide, including thinking about and attempting to commit suicide. The research focused specifically on young users below the age of 35, noting that though this link was found, the findings don’t necessarily mean that cannabis use is the cause of the observed association. The research … Continue reading
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The streaming platform has a new batch of streamers making money from viewers.
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Lips Neon Signs Thin Line Seamless Pattern Background Include of Lip, Kiss and Mouth. Vector illustration of Icons

You’re reading Sex Diaries, a HuffPost UK Personal series about how we are (or aren’t) having sex. To share your story, get in touch on [email protected]

Nigerians are good at a lot of things, and pretence is definitely one of them. Whether it’s pretending to like people we don’t like, or pretending to not like people we like so it doesn’t get in their heads, we pretend a lot. 

But the most amazing aspect of this pretentiousness is how we love to claim we don’t have sex. Which is funny because, according to the Society for Family Health Nigeria, we use about 400 million condoms yearly. If we are not having sex, who is using the condoms?

When it comes to those of us who do admit that people have sex, there’s a habit of slut-shaming that is downright outrageous. For some reason, sex between two people is treated like only the woman was involved in it. There is still the conscious or subconscious belief that, somehow, a woman’s worth is tied to her vagina, and that her marginal utility begins to reduce once she begins to have sex. And any woman who enjoys sex? That’s a slut!

Slut-shaming here is so commonplace it’s almost the norm. You start experiencing it once you hit puberty – sometimes even before. One of the most infuriating things about it is the sheer audacity of the people who engage in it. More times than I can remember, I have been slut-shamed for merely walking on the road or refusing to give out my phone number. It’s sick. Whether I politely decline or rudely ignore them, I’m still going to be called a slut. 

The openly sexual male is a player, while the openly sexual female is indecent and a prostitute.

More often than not, this is usually the first time a growing girl experiences it. It gets confusing. Do I give out my number so I can have some peace? What happens when I pass this route again? As you grow up and learn how to deal with that, you start facing society members who believe you slept your way to every good place you’re in. An expensive phone? You fucked for it. A promotion? You fucked for it. A car? You fucked for it. Seen with a rich man? He’s definitely your sugar daddy.

The slut-shaming isn’t just external either. It happens internally as well. Family, friends, colleagues say stuff about you. I was once called a prostitute by a close relative because I opened a bank account without parental consent. I was called a “hoe” and worse by a considerable number of people – some of whom were supposed to be my friends – because of sex between some dude who lied and me. He did the lying, but I got the smoke.

There’s also the issue of the very people you’re sleeping with slut-shaming you. I mean, we are together but somehow you’re the stud and I’m the slut? Incredible. Nothing seems to stop your sexual partner from slut-shaming you for the sex you are (or were) having. Guys get out of relationships and begin to call their exes all sorts. Sometimes, they go as far as commodifying you and your body parts, to the adulation of other members of society. Then you begin to wonder if you had the sex in question alone.

People try to pass slut-shaming off as a joke but the reality is that it sucks big time. Nobody wants to be insulted for simply choosing to live free.

You see, the openly sexual male is a player, while the openly sexual female is indecent and a prostitute. I love adult jokes – I crack a ton of funny ones myself. But someone called my attention to it saying it was making people around think of me as loose. Can’t lie, I felt rather disappointed in everyone involved. I compared myself to a man in the same circle – If my jokes were dirty, his were downright filthy. However, he was funny and I was slutty? I keep my jokes to myself now. These people are clearly unworthy of such premium content.

Sometimes I deliberately do more of what I was doing just to spite the shamer. Sex? I’ll have more of it. Dirty jokes? I’ll crack dirtier ones. Short skirt? The next one I’ll wear will be shorter – with a thigh slit. I don’t think the comments made by the slut-shaming blockheads should weigh anyone down and stop them from enjoying themselves. I mean, we only live once, don’t we? If we live our lives always keeping what people will say in mind, we will simply not live for us; we’ll live for them.

But I understand that not everyone has thick skin. Sometimes, people try to pass slut-shaming off as a joke but the reality is that it sucks big time. Nobody wants to be insulted for simply choosing to live free. I don’t see slut-shaming as a hurdle. It’s more like a speed breaker – sometimes, the comments might slow me down, sometimes I just ignore them and speed along and sometimes, I don’t even see them and I just speed through. Bumpy, but we move.

Tobi Adebanjo is a freelance writer and student

Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected]

Sandra Wilson 2020-09-02
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One of Britain’s biggest trade unions is “institutionally sexist”, a damning independent report has found.

The GMB union, whose general secretary Tim Roache suddenly quit this year amid allegations of misconduct, needs “fundamental change” the probe by barrister Karon Monaghan QC concluded.

“Bullying, misogyny, cronyism and sexual harassment are endemic within the GMB,” the report said.

“The culture in the GMB is one of heavy drinking and late night socialising, salacious gossip and a lack of professionalism.”

The GMB has more than 600,000 members across many job sectors, including NHS staff, ambulance drivers, school cleaners, council staff, security staff and a range of manufacturing workers. 

The report - which covered the period 2010 to 2020 and interviewed three former general secretaries - added: “The GMB’s policies and practices are not sufficiently clear or robust to deal with sexual harassment among employees or members.

“The GMB is institutionally sexist. The general secretaries and all regional secretaries are, and always have been, men. Women are underrepresented throughout the GMB’s ranks.”

Monaghan was asked in May to conduct an investigation into a “number of very serious allegations made by way of anonymous correspondence”.

Former general secretary Tim Roache

An unsigned letter circulated to senior members of the union made a string of misconduct allegations against Roache.

The union opted to order an inquiry not into the specific allegations but into the wider culture within its ranks.

The final report - which was based on 150 different submissions and interviews with 39 individuals - is withering in is assessment of the deep problems that affect the union at all levels.

Even though more than half of its members are women, “job segregration” along gender lines means the top officer posts are held by men. Women are instead sidelined in ‘staff’ roles such as “secretarial, finance management, reception, admin, cleaners”.

Monaghan concluded there was “stereotyping around male and female roles”.“When women do succeed in achieving more senior
roles, it is often said that they have ‘slept their way to the top’,” she wrote.

Local branches of the union often deter women because their meetings are held in the pub after work. “They are typically run, I was told, by ‘geezers’ and
much like other aspects of the regions, on a ‘job for the boys’ basis,” the report says.

In one of the most damning sections of the report, it found that sexual harassment was “common in the GMB” and was regular at its booze-fuelled annual Congress. There was a “predatory attitude” towards women.

“Examples of sexual harassment I heard about included touching hair, leering, commenting on body shape and clothes, placing hands around a woman’s waist, staring at a woman’s breasts or “tits”, propositioning young women, “sloppy kisses”, “lip kisses”, “sticking a tongue” in a woman’s ear, touching of knees, bottoms and hips, hugs, and slapping of a backside.

 

“Sometimes sexual harassment is used as a form of bullying with examples given to me of men deliberately sexually harassing women in public to humiliate and embarrass them. I have also heard of more serious sexual assaults. I was told by one witness that ’it is simply expected that you’ll have to suffer from being groped at events.”

The report calls for strong disciplinary action against sexual harassers and the break up of the current powers of the general secretary and regional secretaries who effectively run the union, with ‘lay’ members instead given much more oversight and control.

The human resources department, which has just two members, should be hugely expanded and equalities put at the heart of the structure and rules of the union. Its bullying and harassment policies should be totally overhauled and strengthened, Monaghan said.

She also concluded: “I am satisfied that the GMB is not a comfortable place to be for many employees and members from Black and minority ethnic groups.”

Barbara Plant, national president of the GMB, had supported the inquiry to ensure that the “safety of our people, particularly women” was paramount.

Plant said on Wednesday that the union’s Central Executive Council would now act on the recommendations to deliver “transformational change”.

“Karon’s report makes sad and difficult reading.  On behalf of GMB, I apologise to all those who have experienced sexual harassment or bullying within the union.

“It’s clear that real and lasting change is needed for us to become a safe and inclusive place for all.”

Among submissions to the inquiry was one from a Labour MP which claimed the union had “a real cultural issue with sexual harassment which went from the top to the bottom of the organisation.”

Roache stepped down in April after 40 years at the GMB, citing chronic fatigue syndrome as the reason for his departure. But his resignation, just months after he was reelected to his post in November, sparked claims he was forced out.

The move led to bitter infighting, with claim and counter-claim of bullying and misconduct.

Roache was first elected in 2015, when he succeeded Sir Paul Kenny as the union’s chief.

More than 50 Labour MPs are members of the union and its representatives play a key role on its ruling National Executive Committee.

One Labour MP, who is a member of the union, was scathing. They told HuffPost UK that the report confirmed that “GMB is a union controlled by the male, pale and sometimes stale”.

“At GMB the Regional Secretaries are seen as untouchable, not to be challenged and they’re all men. If they don’t want any change it never happens. 

“This whole culture has been built up over decades – unaccountable power, big pay offs for mates even if they’ve completely failed in their jobs, bullying of anyone who descents or questions the wisdom of the regions, the denigration of women who are seen to step out of line and jobs for the boys.”

It backed Lisa Nandy in the recent Labour leadership contest and Roache was seen as critical of Jeremy Corbyn during his reign.

John Phillips, GMB regional secretary for Wales and South West, has been appointed the union’s acting general secretary until a replacement for Roache is elected.

The union will next consider a timetable for the election to start possibly within weeks, but it is unlikely to see a new boss in place until next spring.

The race is expected to turn into a contest between Scottish regional secretary Gary Smith and national secretary Rehana Azam.

Azam tweeted her reaction to the report.

Sandra Wilson 2020-07-30
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Apple Iphone 11

  • Apple said it expects supply of its next iPhone to be available "a few weeks later" compared to last year's iPhone launch.
  • The comments come as reports have suggested the next-generation iPhone may be delayed because of supply chain issues stemming from the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Apple made the comments in the context of giving investors some insight into what it expects for the next quarter since it didn't issue guidance.
  • Apple reported growth across all product segments, including the iPhone, in its fiscal third-quarter earnings report. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Apple said the launch of its anticipated 5G iPhone will likely be delayed a few weeks as the company's supply chain recovers from the coronavirus pandemic. 

The company did not provide revenue guidance for its fiscal fourth quarter because of uncertainty stemming from COVID-19. But during its fiscal third-quarter earnings call, the company did provide some insight into what it's expecting across its biggest product segments for the September quarter.

When discussing the iPhone, Apple said that although it started selling new iPhones in late September last year, it expects "supply to be available a few weeks later."

"This year the supply of the new product will be a few weeks later than that," Luca Maestri, Apple's senior vice president and chief financial officer, said on the company's earnings call. 

It's far from being the first indication that Apple's next iPhone could see a delayed launch. Bloomberg's Mark Gurman reported back in April that at least some versions of the new iPhone could launch a few weeks later than usual, noting that they would still likely debut in the fall time frame. Analysts from J.P. Morgan previously suggested that the next iPhone could be delayed by one or two months.

It also wouldn't be the first time that Apple launched an iPhone later than its typical September window. In 2018, for example, it began selling the iPhone XR in October, while the iPhone X launched in November 2017.

Apple's next iPhone, expected to be called the iPhone 12, is rumored to be its first 5G iPhone. Other than 5G connectivity, reports suggest it will come with a fresh design in new screen sizes. It may also come with a LiDAR sensor for enabling better augmented reality performance, much like the most recent iPad Pro.

The comments came after Apple reported a blowout earnings report that saw growth across all product segments — including the iPhone, which had suffered multiple quarters of decline. Apple attributed the iPhone's growth to the new iPhone SE it launched in April, some of the reopenings that took place in May and June, and the popularity of last year's iPhone 11. 

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

Sandra Wilson 2020-07-10
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From flying a plane to restoring art, YouTubers can truly teach you anything. Here are the best shows that have sparked our curiosity during quarantine.
Sandra Wilson 2019-09-09
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Facebook has turned off automatic facial recognition for its users and the US Department of Defense wants to hire an ethicist to, you know, develop AI for good, of course.

AI engineers from industry and academia are collaborating to launch a challenge to advance technology to detect fake visual content manipulated by machine learning algorithms.

The contest, known as the Deepfake Detection Challenge (DFDC), is spearheaded by a long list of names, including: Facebook, the San Francisco based nonprofit the Partnership on AI, Microsoft, as well researchers from Cornell Tech, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Oxford, University of California, Berkeley, University of Maryland, College Park, and University at Albany-SUNY.

Doctored videos of actors and actresses may seem innocuous - check out the Chinese app Zao - but no one’s laughing much when it comes to world leaders or fake pornography.

The fear of revenge porn or rise of disinformation is real.

So, Facebook has decided to throw $10m (or about half a day's profit) at the problem.

Sandra Wilson 2019-08-20
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True wireless headphones are all the rage, but until now they've all been in-ear models that nestle inside your ear and are relatively compact.

They also convert into a tiny portable Bluetooth speaker and have a language translation mode, but their true wireless nature is what makes them unique.

I can't say I'm in a rush to go out and buy a pair for $399 -- yes, that's a tad pricey -- but they do have some intriguing elements.

The headphones are only available on the company's website and international prices don't appear to be available, but the $399 converts to about £330 or AU$590.

For starters, they sound decent.

They also seem well engineered, with responsive touch controls and a nice matte black finish.

Sandra Wilson 2021-05-21
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And I'm here for it. This is now one of the cheapest ways to enjoy offline Spotify on the go.
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Crypto whiz Justin Sun bought a piece of digital art from artist Beeple for a record $69.3 million at a Christie's auction on Thursday.
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"I don't think there's anything sexy about" COVID, Yandy's vice president of merchandising told Business Insider.
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With six pistols to choose from, each with its own feel and benefits, which is best with the Akimbo perk?
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On 18 July 2000, the first episode of Big Brother debuted on Channel 4. Ten complete strangers agreed to live together under constant surveillance, in a bid to last as long in the infamous house as possible and bag themselves £70,000.

What followed was a game-changing TV phenomenon.

Big Brother’s unique premise meant there was already some intrigue around its launch, but no one in those early days could have predicted how the show would eventually change not just the TV industry, but the face of celebrity culture in just a few short years.

Before long, millions were tuning in nightly, and Big Brother swiftly became an instant – if temporary – fame machine, with many hopefuls seeing the show as an opportunity to snatch those all-alluring 15 minutes of fame.

Big Brother’s eventual first winner Craig Phillips had a rather different motivation for signing up, though. 

Craig in Big Brother's first ever Diary Room

Craig became aware of Big Brother after watching a documentary about the original Dutch version of the show. At that time, he was fundraising for Joanne Harris, a family friend with Down’s syndrome, who needed money to pay for a heart and lung transplant.

“I had no ambition to be famous in any way,” he tells HuffPost UK, on Big Brother’s 20th anniversary.

“But I thought, ‘If I get on this programme and win, I’ll get £70,000. It sounds easy enough, all I’ve got to do is live with 10 other people’. And I was wrong – it wasn’t easy, that’s for sure.”

I thought, 'no one's heard of Big Brother, no one's going to watch it, so who cares?'

He continues: “I didn’t go on for any other reason, I just thought it would be a quick and easy way to win a lot of money. I was set on trying to get a quarter of a million pounds for Joanne Harris. I just thought, ‘no one’s heard of Big Brother, no one’s going to watch it, so who cares?’.”

As it turns out, Craig was wrong on that front, too. By the first eviction, the show was being watched by 3.4 million people, a figure which had shot up to an estimated 10 million by the time the live final came seven weeks later.

Obviously, with no contact whatsoever with the outside world, the original housemates had no idea just how popular the show was becoming, which potentially explains one of Big Brother’s earliest outrageous moments, in which several of the housemates – including Craig – stripped off, covered themselves in wet clay and painted the living room with their bodies.

 

Recalling of the attention-grabbing incident, Craig says: “We were getting a bit bored in there, and it was only the first week. We were just having a laugh, we never even thought it would get put out to the public.

“We just thought ‘if they’re editing bits out, they’re gonna edit in the actual pottery’ – not necessarily thinking they’d be showing us naked and painting each other’s bodies with clay, then pressing ourselves against the walls.

“No one had ever seen it, so we were all a bit naive going into it. Not that I’m, making excuses, and I’m certainly not sorry I did it – it was just a bit of fun. It was a bit like when students all get in their halls of residence and they’re all taking the piss a bit.”

Still, uninhibited though he and his housemates may have been, Craig says he “never really got used to” being on camera for every minute of the day.

Whenever people used to say 'I forgot the cameras were there'... that's a load of bollocks.

“I wouldn’t say you ever switch off from the cameras. You see them, you hear them, and you’re reminded by Big Brother that you’re being filmed” he remembers.

You’re aware the cameras are in the bedroom, they’re over the top of your head when you’re sitting on the toilet… sometimes when we were lying in the bedroom or the conversation dropped, we’d hear camera-men pulling cables or changing the lenses or dropping things behind the mirrors, and the odd cough here and there. And we were so isolated in there, it was quite refreshing to hear other people.

“So whenever people used to say ‘I forgot the cameras were there, I didn’t mean to do that, I didn’t mean to say that’, that’s a load of bollocks, to be honest. You do know they’re there, you just cope with it. For me, I just tried to ignore them, get on with it, and try not to behave too stupidly.”

Craig Phillips on This Morning in 2019

Craig was also at the centre of what was undoubtedly the series’ most headline-grabbing moment, which saw contestant Nicholas “Nasty Nick” Bateman ousted for cheating.

In the lead-up to the incident, Viewers had already seen Nick making up lies to keep his fellow housemates on his side (including the death of a fiancée), as well as trying to influence the nomination process, which went directly against Big Brother’s rules.

In an episode that was recently revisited as part of the celebratory Big Brother’s Best Shows Ever series, Craig spoke to the rest of the housemates individually about Nick’s behaviour, before confronting him as a group.

 

Craig admits he had never actually seen the episode in question, aside from a few clips, until E4 repeated it in 2020, noting: “It was a little bit cringe-y, but I did kind of get a clearer insight into how much of a cheat and a liar Nasty Nick was. Without seeing [the episode]… I underestimated how blatant he was.

“So that was a bit of a surprise... quite an upsetting and disappointing surprise for me, but certainly interesting.”

He recalls: “[When we confronted him], he tried to put up a bit of an argument. We’d have respected him a bit more if he’d just held his hands up and said ‘I’ve been an idiot, this is what I’ve done’, [but] he left it until we – I’m not saying dragged it out of him – but we had to basically bring him evidence and confront him.”

I even went to Big Brother at one point and said, ‘If Nick is not kicked out, I’m going home'.

At the time, many viewers noticed that Craig took the Nick situation more seriously than many of the other housemates, but as he points out: “I’d gone in there to win this money for this young lady and all of a sudden, I’m up against a cheat. And I only wanted to play fairly, basically.

“So, for me, I was starting to get a bit wound up…  I think I even went to Big Brother at one point and said, ‘if Nick doesn’t go, if he’s not kicked out, I’m going home. I’m not staying in a programme if it’s not going to be fair’.”

In the end, Nick’s behaviour led to him being shown the door, but even though it was the outcome Craig wanted, he recalls there being a sombre mood when his housemate was ejected.

“That was quite a morbid day, saying goodbye to him,” Craig reveals. “We did feel sorry for him, because we were concerned that if the programme had got big, how would he be received outside? It was a morbid day, not a nice afternoon. It was like a funeral feeling.

“Little did I know, it was enhancing my profile, and making people warm to me. And that could be the reason I went on to win, but honestly I don’t know.”

Craig confronts Nick in the Big Brother house

Despite being nominated for eviction more times than any of his housemates (including the five consecutive weeks leading up to the final), as time rolled on, the thought began to occur to Craig that the coveted £70K could soon be his.

“We never knew how we were getting perceived outside, he says. “But it got to about two weeks before the end, and I suddenly thought ‘you know what, I’ve won this’.

“I’d been up against who I thought were the tough competitors, and they were all kicked out. And I woke up one morning – I don’t want to sound cocky, but it was a nice feeling, two weeks left, and all the big boys have been kicked out, and I had a sudden confident feeling that I could win.” 

Of course, the feeling was right. The first ever celebratory Big Brother final was a fitting end to what had been a huge series, and it was difficult not to feel excited on Craig’s behalf as Davina McCall led him out of the house to a fireworks display in his honour – and an extra £70,000 in his bank account.

As it turned out, though, Craig’s buzz on the night was cut short very quickly.

Craig with fellow Big Brother finalists, Darren and Anna

“It was a big celebration for everybody else on the last night, but not for me, that’s for sure,” Craig recalls. “What you saw on television, me coming out of the house, meeting Jo, and seeing my family... then getting up on stage with all the other Big Brother housemates and the fireworks – that, for me, only lasted five minutes.

“The moment the cameras stopped, I was rushed away by bodyguards. Literally dragged off, put into a vehicle, police escort, whisked away to a big hotel. And it was scary, it was like I was being kidnapped… it was all rush-rush, not many people were talking to me or explaining to me what was happening and why.

“All I wanted to do was see my friends and family, you know? I’d been cooped up for 64 days, I wanted out, I wanted to have a party.” 

Instead, he was sat down with Big Brother’s psychiatrists, who calmly tried to explain how big the show had become during his time away from the outside world and, as Craig puts it, “how I was going to have to adapt to things”.

It was a big celebration for everybody else on the last night, but not for me, that’s for sure.

“It was quite a nerve-racking thing, when you’ve got a psychiatrist telling you that you’ll be on the front page of every national newspaper, and every radio station and every news bulletin was talking about you,” Craig says. ”[The psychiatrist]’s words were ‘you’ll be the most talked-about person in Britain’.

“It’s scary, you know, I can recall hearing what he was saying to me, but I wasn’t fully digesting it. You try to process that in your mind, that all of a sudden the whole country knows your name, but where do you go from there? What do you do? It’s quite a scary thing to digest. So I’ve got to say that wasn’t the best night.”

He adds: “I had a briefing with press officers and had people telling me security would be with me 24 hours a day, and they’d be chaperoning me around, that I couldn’t go home [because] the press would be chasing us. And how do you deal with that?” 

Craig celebrates his win with Big Brother host Davina McCall

After four hours, in the early hours of the morning, Craig was allowed a visit from his cousin, Steve, which is the moment he was given his first opportunity to really celebrate.

When Steve arrived, the agents and the security guards were like please don’t try and leave the building or anything, if you want anything come to the door and the security can relay it to whoever’,” he says.

“We were in this big massive suite, two or three thousand pound suite, with this massive bed in the middle. And basically, you know that scene in Rocky III where Rocky and Apollo are on the beach? It was a little bit like that, two grown men bouncing up and down on the bed and hugging each other, and screaming and shouting.

“And then, we had the bodyguards knocking at the door – and we thought we were going to get told off for making too much noise, but they just brought in two lovely steaks and a few bottles of champagne and beers and things like that. So we enjoyed a lovely meal, at about four o’clock in the morning.”

The psychiatrist's words were ‘you’ll be the most talked-about person in Britain'. What would you do if someone told you that?

Even that wasn’t to last, though, and before long Craig was given some clothes to change into and told he had to head back to the Big Brother house for his first press conference.

He jokes: “I was like ‘oh shit, I haven’t had any sleep yet’. And we’d been drinking! From that day, my life changed, and that was basically my life for the next 97 days – security picking me up early in the morning, taking me everywhere I needed to be, chaperoning me around. Chaperones, press officers, stylists – it was a bit of an entourage that travelled around.”

Although Craig has made the most of his time in the spotlight, presenting numerous DIY and home makeover shows in the last 20 years, he maintains that fame was not something he ever sought out.

In fact, had he not made it onto the first series of Big Brother, he admits he probably wouldn’t have tried out for any future years, because of how famous the contestants ended up becoming. 

Craig posing with Victoria Beckham at the Elle Style Awards, months after his win

“When I went on Big Brother, I didn’t want to work on TV, I didn’t want to be known or recognised or famous in any way, it just kind of turned out that way for me really,” he says.

“When you see [later] series, they knew they were going to be household names when they came out. So I probably wouldn’t have applied, I’d have viewed it a little bit differently.

“And people say to me now, ‘if you didn’t want to be famous, why did you go on that programme?’ But I didn’t know we were going to be famous after going on that programme. I went on to win the money!”

Because of the permanence of celebrity news stories in 2020, and the rise of social media, Craig admits that he thinks the current crop of reality stars, made famous on shows like Love Island, have a tougher time than the early stars of Big Brother.

The old saying was ‘news today is chip paper tomorrow’, whereas nowadays it’s not, is it?

“In those days, the old saying was ‘news today is chip paper tomorrow’, whereas nowadays it’s not, is it?” Craig explains. “News today, it’s there forever, because everything ends up online somewhere down the line, where it can be regurgitated at any time.

“It’s very different with reality personalities nowadays. In the middle of their shows, they’re racing for their million followers on Instagram, and they’re getting abuse. They’re getting the followers – what they want – but it’s a double-edged sword, they’re getting the problems that come with it. So, I think the pressure is on them a little bit more now.”

Still, although he may be a reluctant celebrity, it’s clear that being part of a show that was “the birth of reality TV” is something he’s proud of.

“There’s never been another format that’s done the track record that Big Brother has. Its legacy will be remembered as the pioneers of reality TV, the first ones to make relative nobodies into super-famous people,” he says.

“The whole country has just experienced major lockdown for the first time in their lives – they’ve had a little taste of what we went through, so I could see it coming back now. And I think it would go down a treat.”

Sandra Wilson 2019-10-17
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The multiverse is on the brink of war, with the Third Reich yearning to invade and dominate all realities.

But in the new trailer for the last season of Amazon Prime’s The Man in the High Castle, the rebels who’ve been fighting this alt-history world aren’t going down without a last fight.

The first trailer has arrived for the fourth and final season of The Man in the High Castle, which returns to Amazon Prime next month.

Last season ended on a cliffhanger, with John Smith (Rufus Sewell) on the verge of a major promotion and Julia Crain (Alexa Davalos) tapping into her ability to travel between worlds.

Now, Julia is in our reality, a world where the Germans and Japanese hadn’t invaded the United States, and she becomes more determined than ever to save her own world from the Third Reich.

Meanwhile, John Smith has assumed more control over the Nazis and is moving forward with plans to invade other realities, as his wife Helen (Chelah Horsdal) starts to question his actions.

Sandra Wilson 2019-08-29
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Maryland's law against distributing child pornography applies even when the person distributing a pornographic video is the video's minor subject, Maryland's highest court ruled on Wednesday in a 6-1 vote.

in court documents, was 16 years old when she performed oral sex on an unidentified male.

The act was captured on video—he appears to have been holding the camera—and S.K.

shared the video with two friends via a text message.

She eventually became estranged from one of the friends, a 17-year-old boy, and he showed the video to a police officer at the school.

Indiana Supreme Court: Sex with minors is OK, but it’s illegal to sext them

Sandra Wilson 2019-08-14

The company is planning an update that’ll hopefully remedy the situation and prevent it from happening again, but that change isn’t coming until next month.

One owner’s oven turned on around 2:30AM and broiled at 400 degrees for hours while he slept, and he only noticed when he woke up four hours later.

Nest cam footage captured the exact moment it turned on: the oven illuminates his dark, empty kitchen in a truly Black Mirror-like recording.

It’s billed as “seven appliances in one”: an air fryer, dehydrator, slow cooker, broiler, toaster, warming drawer, and convection countertop oven.

It also pairs with an app that allows people to choose their temperature and cooking settings, as well as live stream their food as it cooks thanks to the built-in camera.

However, with that connected promise comes a risk: the oven is always available through the tap of an app, which can be both good and bad.