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Thomas Musick 2021-05-24
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The massive digital platform market has until recently been dominated by a handful of US-based companies such as Facebook and Google. However, as foreign governments and competing platforms try to erode this domination, platforms are becoming a new sphere of geopolitical maneuvering. The European Union wants to gain more control over international tech companies and achieve more independence in the digital arena. India has banned 177 Chinese apps on the grounds they are “prejudicial to the sovereignty and integrity of India”. And in 2020, the then US President Donald Trump spent months attempting to ban the Chinese-made video-sharing platform TikTok…

This story continues at The Next Web
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Thomas Musick 2021-04-10
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With the gigantic 1.2 patch, Cyberpunk 2077 now supports ray tracing on AMD graphics cards. But we put it to the test and you're better off just leaving it disabled.
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Thomas Musick 2021-02-12
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The Trump-led U.S. government was very angry that the American technology companies let China beat them to 5G. However, technological innovations never come cheap. The ...

The post The U.S. will lose its technological dominance soon – see why appeared first on Gizchina.com.

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Thomas Musick 2020-10-02
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Friday’s breaking news alerts and headlines have generated shockwaves across the world, but a positive Covid-19 diagnosis is just yet another piece of bad news for Donald Trump in his bid to secure a second term in the White House. 

Just 32 days to the US elections, and the president has been forced to cancel all his upcoming rallies and engagements. It’s unclear whether or not he will be able to attend the second presidential debate due to take place on October 15.

Here are all the ways Trump has had a very, very bad month.

He could face prison over taxes

New bombshell tax revelations about Trump and his oldest daughter, Ivanka Trump, first reported in the New York Times, show how the president managed to avoid taxes for much of the past decade and a half. 

According to the report, Trump paid only $750 in income tax in the year he was elected president. The newspaper also claimed he had not paid taxes in 10 of the 15 years they obtained records for, with his businesses taking on substantial loans and suffering massive losses.

Trump has denied any wrongdoing, but a former federal prosecutor has said there is “no question” some of these revelations could qualify as tax fraud and not tax avoidance, in which case they could ultimately send him to prison.

He was caught referring to American war dead as “losers”

Trump was roundly condemned by the families of fallen US service members for reportedly referring to Americans who died fighting in the First World War as “suckers” and “losers”, first reported in The Atlantic. 

Trump has been criticised in the past for making disparaging remarks about American war veterans and military families.

He is said to have uttered the belittling remarks during a 2018 visit to France, where he cancelled a visit to a WWI cemetery, allegedly saying to his staff: “Why should I go to that cemetery? It’s filled with losers.” 

Trump has been criticised in the past for making disparaging remarks about veterans and military families, including famously once denigrating the late senator and war veteran, John McCain. “He’s not a war hero,” Trump said in 2015 of McCain. “I like people who weren’t captured.”

A poll released following the publication of his alleged comments showed support for Trump had fallen among active-duty officers and troops.

He refused to condemn the Proud Boys

During the presidential debate on Tuesday night, Trump chose not to condemn the violent far-right hate group the Proud Boys, instead telling them to “stand by”. 

Responding to a question from moderator Chris Wallace, who asked if he would condemn white supremacist and militia groups that have showed up at some protests, Trump said: “Sure, I’m willing to do that. But I would say almost everything I see is from the left wing, not from the right wing.”

On the Proud Boys’ account on the messaging app Telegram, members of the group celebrated the apparent endorsement

“Trump basically said to go fuck them up,” said one of the Proud Boys’ leaders in a chat on the right-wing social media app Parler. 

This makes me so happy.”

He claimed “virtually nobody” gets Covid-19

At a campaign rally in Ohio last week, Trump attempted to downplay the coronavirus pandemic by saying it affects “elderly people with heart problems and other problems”.

Trump attempted to downplay the coronavirus pandemic by saying it

“That’s what it really affects. That’s it,” he told supporters. “In some states, thousands of people, nobody young... they have a strong immune system, who knows,” he said. “But it affects virtually nobody. It’s an amazing thing.”

His comments were criticised for being callous and wildly inaccurate – according to official US figures, more than 400,000 people under the age of 18 have been infected with the coronavirus. 

Cases of the virus have been on the rise in the US, with 55,000 new positive cases last Friday – marking the highest single-day increase since August 14.

The US death toll from Covid-19 is also by far the highest in the world – more than 208,000 people have died after contracting the disease, according to data from the Johns Hopkins University.

...and then tested positive for it

Just days after one of his closest advisers who had Covid-19 travelled with him aboard Air Force One, Trump and first lady Melania Trump tested positive for coronavirus. 

Trump is currently said to be “well at this time” and “remains healthy”, but the fact that the president is 74 and considered obese means that he faces an increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus.

His presidential rival Joe Biden has tested negative for the illness despite the pair's shouty debate on Tuesday.

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Thomas Musick 2021-05-18
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Butt-breathing could be no joke in the future for patients with respiratory failure.
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Thomas Musick 2021-03-17
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Boris Johnson

Misogyny is set to be recorded by police as a “hate crime” after the government bowed to pressure in the House of Lords to toughen the law on protecting women.

In a bid to avoid a government defeat, Home office minister Baroness Williams announced that all police forces in England and Wales would be asked from this autumn to record crimes motivated by “hatred of sex or gender”.

Campaigners hope the move is a key step towards wider change that would give judges the power to impose tougher sentences for incidents of abuse and harassment, including street harassment.

The independent Law Commission watchdog has already recommended including the characteristic of sex or gender to existing hate crime laws. It has said the “vast majority of evidence” suggested several crimes are linked to misogyny.

Some seven police forces currently record misogyny as a hate crime but campaigners have called for a nationwide approach to help crack down on abuse and harassment of women and girls.

Baroness Williams said: “We do agree that data can be helpful. And we know that some police forces are already collecting it like Nottingham.

“So I will advise the House that, on an experimental basis, we will ask police forces to record and identify any crimes of violence against the person, including stalking and harassment and sexual offences, where the victim perceives it to have been motivated by a hostility based on their sex, which, as I have said, can then inform longer-term decisions.

“Once we have considered the Law Commission’s recommendations, we will shortly begin the consultation with the National Police Chiefs Council and forces on this, with a view to commencing the experimental collection of data from this autumn.”

Labour MP Stella Creasy, who has led calls for a change in the law and secured the commission’s review in 2018, welcomed the government’s move.

“I’m delighted that the government has listened to this cross-party and grassroots campaign to make misogyny a hate crime and is now taking the first steps towards making it happen.

“Recording where crimes are motivated by hatred of women will help us better understand the scale of the problem and so be better able to prevent these crimes – it should give all women confidence that if they come forward to report crimes they will be taken seriously, too.

“Now we want the government to implement the outcome of the law commission review in the sentencing bill so that our courts start to take misogyny and the crimes it drives seriously, too.”

The latest policy shift came amid widespread shock and anger at the death of Sarah Everard and the heavily criticised policing of a vigil in her memory last weekend.

Boris Johnson told MPs in prime minister’s questions that the country had to “address the fundamental issue of the casual, everyday sexism and apathy that fails to address the concerns of women”.

Crimes such as assault, harassment or criminal damage are already considered hate crime in cases where a person’s race, religion, sexual orientation, disability or transgender identity is involved, and are treated more seriously by the courts.

But campaigners have criticised the complex nature of the existing laws, and called for sex and gender to be added to the list.

Following the government concession, non-aligned peer Baroness Kennedy opted not to push to a vote her cross-party amendment to the Domestic Abuse Bill.

Kennedy had urged the government to “take a decision that will help ensure that all women everywhere can enjoy the same freedoms as men, when it comes to being able to go where we want and do what we want, without fear”.

“Since Sarah’s tragic murder came to the public attention, women everywhere have shared their stories of harassment, abuse, and violence at home and on the streets, and their frustration that all too frequently these crimes are not treated with the seriousness they deserve.”

Among backers of the amendment were Tory former ministers Baroness Altman and Lord Young.

The campaign has also been backed by metro mayors Andy Burnham, Steve Rotherham, Sadiq Khan and Dan Jarvis.

Earlier, peers inflicted a further defeat on the government in demanding that all domestic abuse victims receive protection and support regardless of immigration status and eligibility for public .

The Lords backed a cross-party change to the Domestic Abuse Bill, aimed at providing a blanket safeguard for women, by 310 votes to 232, majority 78.

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Thomas Musick 2020-10-23
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If the US brought back the Great Depression’s massive worker program, it could put millions of Americans back to work—and help stave off disasters like wildfires.
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Thomas Musick 2020-08-12
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Could it possibly be a roundabout way of getting people to preorder the new Bronco?
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Thomas Musick 2021-04-26
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With the help of A.I. voice analysis, it's now possible to discern the emotions that a person feels while they speak. The implications of that are huge.
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Thomas Musick 2021-03-08
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NFTs are appearing everywhere online, and you’re probably wondering what they are, so we’re here to explain the latest digital fad.
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Thomas Musick 2020-10-21
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US mobile chip giant Qualcomm has launched a new portfolio of chips that take aim at the 5G radio access network market.
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Thomas Musick 2020-07-30
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  • Many people in the tech industry are choosing to move to Canada over the US because of the US' restrictive immigration laws.
  • Since 2013, Toronto has added more tech jobs than any other place in North America, including Silicon Valley.
  • 25% of Canada's overall workforce are immigrants, and in the tech space that number is even higher — 40%.
  • View more episodes of Business Insider Today on Facebook.

Silicon Valley's reputation as the world's leading tech hub could be in jeopardy because of the United States' restrictive immigration laws.

Tens of thousands of immigrant tech workers have flocked to Toronto in the past few years, making it the fastest growing tech hub in North America.

Many of them are deliberately avoiding the US as the Trump administration clamps down on immigration. In June, President Donald Trump temporarily suspended visas known as H-1B visas, which are awarded to thousands of skilled immigrant workers each year.

The visa suspension is prompting some immigrants, like former Silicon Valley product manager Asim Fayaz, to move north to Canada. 

"There is a whole world out there, and you are probably better off going somewhere else because you'd be treated more human," said Fayaz, a Pakistani immigrant who now runs an online restaurant business in Toronto. "You don't need to be, like, pleading for your existence all the time."

Every year, the US government reserves 85,000 H-1B visas for skilled foreign professionals — people like Elon Musk, who was born in South Africa and started companies such as Tesla and SpaceX in the US.

Fayaz came to the US to attend the University of California, and landed a job after graduating with a master's degree in 2016. As an immigrant, trying to find work in the US was tough — he needed an American employer to not just hire him, but also sponsor his H-1B work visa.

H1B Still 30

This year, immigration laws suddenly changed as Trump suspended the program, citing "an unusual threat to the employment of American workers" during the coronavirus pandemic. The move left thousands in limbo.

But while the US is closing doors, Canada has been rolling out the welcome mat. Since 2013, the number of tech jobs in Toronto has skyrocketed from about 148,000 to 228,000, an increase of 54%.

"We have over 100,000 people immigrate to the Toronto region each year, which is twice as many as San Francisco Bay Area," Jason Goldlist, cofounder of TechToronto, said. And we don't just attract the quantity. It's also quality because a fifth of these immigrants already have a STEM degree before they even arrive here.

Canadian e-commerce giant Shopify is trying to capitalize on the opportunity. Following Trump's announcement, CEO Tobias Lutke — himself an immigrant from Germany — tweeted, "If this affects your plans consider coming to Canada instead."

Sandeep Anand, the company's senior mobility lead, echoed Lutke's call for talent: "Whether they're already in Canada, whether they're globally present, we're looking to really expand our diverse workforce. And in some cases it does mean that we would need to relocate and provide immigration support, which we're happy to do," she told Business Insider Today.

According to a 2016 study, 25% of Canada's workforce are immigrants. And in the tech space, that number is even higher — 40%, or 350,000 workers.

donald trump oval officeAnd there's still room for more, says Ilya Brotzky, the founder & CEO of VanHack, a Canadian firm that helps place global talent in tech jobs across North America. Brotzky cited Canada's 3% unemployment rate in the tech sector, well below its overall unemployment rate. 

"It's not like there's a bunch of Canadians waiting to take these jobs," Brotzky said. "The unemployment rate is really, really low. We can't find the people."

Brotzky argues it makes economic sense for US companies to open offices in Canada, as well.

"You have these people that can basically work in the same time zone, quick flight from you, really easy laws, super fast to set up, and you have the benefit of Canadian dollar salaries," he told Business Insider Today. "But more importantly, you have access to the global talent pool. So you can bring in any developer from around the world that's good."

That's why Canada is trying to attract highly skilled foreign professionals through visa programs like the Global Talent Stream, launched in 2017. Immigration experts say it is like the H-1B program, but a lot better. 

"It's a very fast processing time. It takes anywhere from roughly around two weeks to complete the first stage. And then the second stage, which is the work permit stage. It takes another two weeks. So you could be in Canada as quickly as a month," Blayne Kumar, founder of the immigration services company Bright Immigration, said.

Toronto

For Fayaz, the decision to move from the US to Canada came after he was laid off from his Silicon Valley company, when he and his wife became fed up with constantly worrying about their legal status.

"It's not even like in 10 years, I will get it," he said. "It's like maybe, maybe not. Who knows, who cares. We don't need you in this country."

And the recent suspension of the H-1B visa program only confirmed his worst fears.

"You know that scene in movies where the actor is leaving the scene and the world is blowing up behind you, right? I feel like that — that I kind of managed to exit the scene somehow, magically," he said. "And I look back and the US is just blowing up."

"So many of my friends, people that I worked with, went to school with, they're all impacted. And whenever I get a phone call, I just feel so sorry for all those people."

SEE ALSO: Canada is way ahead in sRemote work could accelerate the tech industry's migration to Canada, where affordable costs of living and more open immigration policies are helping create tech hubs to rival Silicon Valleycooping up tech talent from the US

DON'T MISS: Scientists and entrepreneurs are pioneering plastic alternatives with the goal of creating materials that can be recycled over and over

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

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Thomas Musick 2021-04-17
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Welcome back to This Week in Apps, the weekly TechCrunch series that recaps the latest in mobile OS news, mobile applications and the overall app economy. The app industry is as hot as ever, with a record 218 billion downloads and $143 billion in global consumer spend in 2020. Consumers last year also spent 3.5 trillion minutes using apps on Android […]
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Thomas Musick 2021-02-23
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Disney Plus has expanded with the addition of Star, a new channel that includes more adult-oriented content.
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Thomas Musick 2020-10-05
On this week's Get WIRED podcast, a look at the under-appreciated women who scored many of your favorite games.
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Thomas Musick 2020-07-22
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A growing number of endocrine-disrupting household chemicals have been linked to widespread health problems.
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Thomas Musick 2021-05-24
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The massive digital platform market has until recently been dominated by a handful of US-based companies such as Facebook and Google. However, as foreign governments and competing platforms try to erode this domination, platforms are becoming a new sphere of geopolitical maneuvering. The European Union wants to gain more control over international tech companies and achieve more independence in the digital arena. India has banned 177 Chinese apps on the grounds they are “prejudicial to the sovereignty and integrity of India”. And in 2020, the then US President Donald Trump spent months attempting to ban the Chinese-made video-sharing platform TikTok…

This story continues at The Next Web
Thomas Musick 2021-04-26
img
With the help of A.I. voice analysis, it's now possible to discern the emotions that a person feels while they speak. The implications of that are huge.
Thomas Musick 2021-04-10
img
With the gigantic 1.2 patch, Cyberpunk 2077 now supports ray tracing on AMD graphics cards. But we put it to the test and you're better off just leaving it disabled.
Thomas Musick 2021-03-08
img
NFTs are appearing everywhere online, and you’re probably wondering what they are, so we’re here to explain the latest digital fad.
Thomas Musick 2021-02-12
img

The Trump-led U.S. government was very angry that the American technology companies let China beat them to 5G. However, technological innovations never come cheap. The ...

The post The U.S. will lose its technological dominance soon – see why appeared first on Gizchina.com.

Thomas Musick 2020-10-21
img
US mobile chip giant Qualcomm has launched a new portfolio of chips that take aim at the 5G radio access network market.
Thomas Musick 2020-10-02
img

Friday’s breaking news alerts and headlines have generated shockwaves across the world, but a positive Covid-19 diagnosis is just yet another piece of bad news for Donald Trump in his bid to secure a second term in the White House. 

Just 32 days to the US elections, and the president has been forced to cancel all his upcoming rallies and engagements. It’s unclear whether or not he will be able to attend the second presidential debate due to take place on October 15.

Here are all the ways Trump has had a very, very bad month.

He could face prison over taxes

New bombshell tax revelations about Trump and his oldest daughter, Ivanka Trump, first reported in the New York Times, show how the president managed to avoid taxes for much of the past decade and a half. 

According to the report, Trump paid only $750 in income tax in the year he was elected president. The newspaper also claimed he had not paid taxes in 10 of the 15 years they obtained records for, with his businesses taking on substantial loans and suffering massive losses.

Trump has denied any wrongdoing, but a former federal prosecutor has said there is “no question” some of these revelations could qualify as tax fraud and not tax avoidance, in which case they could ultimately send him to prison.

He was caught referring to American war dead as “losers”

Trump was roundly condemned by the families of fallen US service members for reportedly referring to Americans who died fighting in the First World War as “suckers” and “losers”, first reported in The Atlantic. 

Trump has been criticised in the past for making disparaging remarks about American war veterans and military families.

He is said to have uttered the belittling remarks during a 2018 visit to France, where he cancelled a visit to a WWI cemetery, allegedly saying to his staff: “Why should I go to that cemetery? It’s filled with losers.” 

Trump has been criticised in the past for making disparaging remarks about veterans and military families, including famously once denigrating the late senator and war veteran, John McCain. “He’s not a war hero,” Trump said in 2015 of McCain. “I like people who weren’t captured.”

A poll released following the publication of his alleged comments showed support for Trump had fallen among active-duty officers and troops.

He refused to condemn the Proud Boys

During the presidential debate on Tuesday night, Trump chose not to condemn the violent far-right hate group the Proud Boys, instead telling them to “stand by”. 

Responding to a question from moderator Chris Wallace, who asked if he would condemn white supremacist and militia groups that have showed up at some protests, Trump said: “Sure, I’m willing to do that. But I would say almost everything I see is from the left wing, not from the right wing.”

On the Proud Boys’ account on the messaging app Telegram, members of the group celebrated the apparent endorsement

“Trump basically said to go fuck them up,” said one of the Proud Boys’ leaders in a chat on the right-wing social media app Parler. 

This makes me so happy.”

He claimed “virtually nobody” gets Covid-19

At a campaign rally in Ohio last week, Trump attempted to downplay the coronavirus pandemic by saying it affects “elderly people with heart problems and other problems”.

Trump attempted to downplay the coronavirus pandemic by saying it

“That’s what it really affects. That’s it,” he told supporters. “In some states, thousands of people, nobody young... they have a strong immune system, who knows,” he said. “But it affects virtually nobody. It’s an amazing thing.”

His comments were criticised for being callous and wildly inaccurate – according to official US figures, more than 400,000 people under the age of 18 have been infected with the coronavirus. 

Cases of the virus have been on the rise in the US, with 55,000 new positive cases last Friday – marking the highest single-day increase since August 14.

The US death toll from Covid-19 is also by far the highest in the world – more than 208,000 people have died after contracting the disease, according to data from the Johns Hopkins University.

...and then tested positive for it

Just days after one of his closest advisers who had Covid-19 travelled with him aboard Air Force One, Trump and first lady Melania Trump tested positive for coronavirus. 

Trump is currently said to be “well at this time” and “remains healthy”, but the fact that the president is 74 and considered obese means that he faces an increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus.

His presidential rival Joe Biden has tested negative for the illness despite the pair's shouty debate on Tuesday.

Thomas Musick 2020-07-30
img
  • Many people in the tech industry are choosing to move to Canada over the US because of the US' restrictive immigration laws.
  • Since 2013, Toronto has added more tech jobs than any other place in North America, including Silicon Valley.
  • 25% of Canada's overall workforce are immigrants, and in the tech space that number is even higher — 40%.
  • View more episodes of Business Insider Today on Facebook.

Silicon Valley's reputation as the world's leading tech hub could be in jeopardy because of the United States' restrictive immigration laws.

Tens of thousands of immigrant tech workers have flocked to Toronto in the past few years, making it the fastest growing tech hub in North America.

Many of them are deliberately avoiding the US as the Trump administration clamps down on immigration. In June, President Donald Trump temporarily suspended visas known as H-1B visas, which are awarded to thousands of skilled immigrant workers each year.

The visa suspension is prompting some immigrants, like former Silicon Valley product manager Asim Fayaz, to move north to Canada. 

"There is a whole world out there, and you are probably better off going somewhere else because you'd be treated more human," said Fayaz, a Pakistani immigrant who now runs an online restaurant business in Toronto. "You don't need to be, like, pleading for your existence all the time."

Every year, the US government reserves 85,000 H-1B visas for skilled foreign professionals — people like Elon Musk, who was born in South Africa and started companies such as Tesla and SpaceX in the US.

Fayaz came to the US to attend the University of California, and landed a job after graduating with a master's degree in 2016. As an immigrant, trying to find work in the US was tough — he needed an American employer to not just hire him, but also sponsor his H-1B work visa.

H1B Still 30

This year, immigration laws suddenly changed as Trump suspended the program, citing "an unusual threat to the employment of American workers" during the coronavirus pandemic. The move left thousands in limbo.

But while the US is closing doors, Canada has been rolling out the welcome mat. Since 2013, the number of tech jobs in Toronto has skyrocketed from about 148,000 to 228,000, an increase of 54%.

"We have over 100,000 people immigrate to the Toronto region each year, which is twice as many as San Francisco Bay Area," Jason Goldlist, cofounder of TechToronto, said. And we don't just attract the quantity. It's also quality because a fifth of these immigrants already have a STEM degree before they even arrive here.

Canadian e-commerce giant Shopify is trying to capitalize on the opportunity. Following Trump's announcement, CEO Tobias Lutke — himself an immigrant from Germany — tweeted, "If this affects your plans consider coming to Canada instead."

Sandeep Anand, the company's senior mobility lead, echoed Lutke's call for talent: "Whether they're already in Canada, whether they're globally present, we're looking to really expand our diverse workforce. And in some cases it does mean that we would need to relocate and provide immigration support, which we're happy to do," she told Business Insider Today.

According to a 2016 study, 25% of Canada's workforce are immigrants. And in the tech space, that number is even higher — 40%, or 350,000 workers.

donald trump oval officeAnd there's still room for more, says Ilya Brotzky, the founder & CEO of VanHack, a Canadian firm that helps place global talent in tech jobs across North America. Brotzky cited Canada's 3% unemployment rate in the tech sector, well below its overall unemployment rate. 

"It's not like there's a bunch of Canadians waiting to take these jobs," Brotzky said. "The unemployment rate is really, really low. We can't find the people."

Brotzky argues it makes economic sense for US companies to open offices in Canada, as well.

"You have these people that can basically work in the same time zone, quick flight from you, really easy laws, super fast to set up, and you have the benefit of Canadian dollar salaries," he told Business Insider Today. "But more importantly, you have access to the global talent pool. So you can bring in any developer from around the world that's good."

That's why Canada is trying to attract highly skilled foreign professionals through visa programs like the Global Talent Stream, launched in 2017. Immigration experts say it is like the H-1B program, but a lot better. 

"It's a very fast processing time. It takes anywhere from roughly around two weeks to complete the first stage. And then the second stage, which is the work permit stage. It takes another two weeks. So you could be in Canada as quickly as a month," Blayne Kumar, founder of the immigration services company Bright Immigration, said.

Toronto

For Fayaz, the decision to move from the US to Canada came after he was laid off from his Silicon Valley company, when he and his wife became fed up with constantly worrying about their legal status.

"It's not even like in 10 years, I will get it," he said. "It's like maybe, maybe not. Who knows, who cares. We don't need you in this country."

And the recent suspension of the H-1B visa program only confirmed his worst fears.

"You know that scene in movies where the actor is leaving the scene and the world is blowing up behind you, right? I feel like that — that I kind of managed to exit the scene somehow, magically," he said. "And I look back and the US is just blowing up."

"So many of my friends, people that I worked with, went to school with, they're all impacted. And whenever I get a phone call, I just feel so sorry for all those people."

SEE ALSO: Canada is way ahead in sRemote work could accelerate the tech industry's migration to Canada, where affordable costs of living and more open immigration policies are helping create tech hubs to rival Silicon Valleycooping up tech talent from the US

DON'T MISS: Scientists and entrepreneurs are pioneering plastic alternatives with the goal of creating materials that can be recycled over and over

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid

Thomas Musick 2021-05-18
img
Butt-breathing could be no joke in the future for patients with respiratory failure.
Thomas Musick 2021-04-17
img
Welcome back to This Week in Apps, the weekly TechCrunch series that recaps the latest in mobile OS news, mobile applications and the overall app economy. The app industry is as hot as ever, with a record 218 billion downloads and $143 billion in global consumer spend in 2020. Consumers last year also spent 3.5 trillion minutes using apps on Android […]
Thomas Musick 2021-03-17
img
Boris Johnson

Misogyny is set to be recorded by police as a “hate crime” after the government bowed to pressure in the House of Lords to toughen the law on protecting women.

In a bid to avoid a government defeat, Home office minister Baroness Williams announced that all police forces in England and Wales would be asked from this autumn to record crimes motivated by “hatred of sex or gender”.

Campaigners hope the move is a key step towards wider change that would give judges the power to impose tougher sentences for incidents of abuse and harassment, including street harassment.

The independent Law Commission watchdog has already recommended including the characteristic of sex or gender to existing hate crime laws. It has said the “vast majority of evidence” suggested several crimes are linked to misogyny.

Some seven police forces currently record misogyny as a hate crime but campaigners have called for a nationwide approach to help crack down on abuse and harassment of women and girls.

Baroness Williams said: “We do agree that data can be helpful. And we know that some police forces are already collecting it like Nottingham.

“So I will advise the House that, on an experimental basis, we will ask police forces to record and identify any crimes of violence against the person, including stalking and harassment and sexual offences, where the victim perceives it to have been motivated by a hostility based on their sex, which, as I have said, can then inform longer-term decisions.

“Once we have considered the Law Commission’s recommendations, we will shortly begin the consultation with the National Police Chiefs Council and forces on this, with a view to commencing the experimental collection of data from this autumn.”

Labour MP Stella Creasy, who has led calls for a change in the law and secured the commission’s review in 2018, welcomed the government’s move.

“I’m delighted that the government has listened to this cross-party and grassroots campaign to make misogyny a hate crime and is now taking the first steps towards making it happen.

“Recording where crimes are motivated by hatred of women will help us better understand the scale of the problem and so be better able to prevent these crimes – it should give all women confidence that if they come forward to report crimes they will be taken seriously, too.

“Now we want the government to implement the outcome of the law commission review in the sentencing bill so that our courts start to take misogyny and the crimes it drives seriously, too.”

The latest policy shift came amid widespread shock and anger at the death of Sarah Everard and the heavily criticised policing of a vigil in her memory last weekend.

Boris Johnson told MPs in prime minister’s questions that the country had to “address the fundamental issue of the casual, everyday sexism and apathy that fails to address the concerns of women”.

Crimes such as assault, harassment or criminal damage are already considered hate crime in cases where a person’s race, religion, sexual orientation, disability or transgender identity is involved, and are treated more seriously by the courts.

But campaigners have criticised the complex nature of the existing laws, and called for sex and gender to be added to the list.

Following the government concession, non-aligned peer Baroness Kennedy opted not to push to a vote her cross-party amendment to the Domestic Abuse Bill.

Kennedy had urged the government to “take a decision that will help ensure that all women everywhere can enjoy the same freedoms as men, when it comes to being able to go where we want and do what we want, without fear”.

“Since Sarah’s tragic murder came to the public attention, women everywhere have shared their stories of harassment, abuse, and violence at home and on the streets, and their frustration that all too frequently these crimes are not treated with the seriousness they deserve.”

Among backers of the amendment were Tory former ministers Baroness Altman and Lord Young.

The campaign has also been backed by metro mayors Andy Burnham, Steve Rotherham, Sadiq Khan and Dan Jarvis.

Earlier, peers inflicted a further defeat on the government in demanding that all domestic abuse victims receive protection and support regardless of immigration status and eligibility for public .

The Lords backed a cross-party change to the Domestic Abuse Bill, aimed at providing a blanket safeguard for women, by 310 votes to 232, majority 78.

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