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Did You Know the Care Tips for Senior Dogs?

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Elderly Pet
Did You Know the Care Tips for Senior Dogs?

A dog reaching old age is a blessing, even if it is difficult to see them slow down. Your dog's size and genetics will determine when it reaches senior status. Some giant breeds are considered seniors at age five or six, while smaller breeds are considered seniors around the age of eight to ten years.


Just because your dog reaches a certain age doesn't mean its health will deteriorate suddenly. Aging in dogs is often a slow and gradual process that starts with subtle physical and behavioral changes. By taking proper care of your senior dog from the beginning, you can manage this process, and ensure they continue to enjoy life to the fullest.


Read on the following tips on senior dog care.


Set Up Semi-Annual Vet Visits


Increasing your dog's wellness tests from once a year to twice a year is a good idea now. It comes from the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA), which notes that this will help establish baselines for your pet's health and ensure that "clinically silent health abnormalities" will be caught sooner rather than later.


Stick to a Healthy Diet


In old(er) age, it's tempting to indulge your pet more, but a healthy and balanced diet is more important than ever. At this stage in your dog's life, too many calories can cause inflammation and weight gain, both of which will decrease your dog's quality of life.


Introduce supplements according to your veterinarian's guidance


Additionally to maintaining the same nutritious diet that your pet is used to, talk to your vet about adding supplements, such as fish oil (good for bones, joints, skin, and coat), glucosamine (good for joints), and/or probiotics (good for digestion). In the long run, supplements like these may be able to make a huge difference in your dog's health, and they can often simply be added to their regular meals.


Be Alert to Subtle Signs of Discomfort


Dogs can't communicate, so it's up to us as their caregivers to watch out for signs of distress. The following signs indicate that your pup needs to visit the vet: limping, difficulty changing positions, difficulties climbing stairs or jumping, and lying down while eating or drinking.


To learn more senior pet care tips, you should browse the internet.

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