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Eric Calvillo 2021-06-25
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(Northwestern University) Researchers have discovered that, in an attempt to adapt to impairments from stroke, muscles lose sarcomeres -- their smallest, most basic building blocks. The team hopes this discovery can help improve rehabilitation techniques to rebuild sarcomeres, ultimately helping to ease muscle tightening and shortening.
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0
William Franklin 2021-03-22
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(Northwestern University) A Northwestern research team including Professors Justin Notestein and Peter Stair has demonstrated a new approach to chemical catalysis that results in higher yields of propylene -- the basis for many plastics -- using less energy.
collect
0
James Honor 2020-09-18
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(Northwestern University) Professor James Rondinelli's new design criteria for enhancing the spin lifetime of a class of quantum materials could support Internet of Things devices and other resource-intensive technologies.
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0
Manuel Scarborough 2021-07-21
img
(Northwestern University) The method from a research team led by Professor Horacio Espinosa could lead to more accurate predictions of how new materials behave at the atomic scale.
collect
0
Donald Herrera 2018-12-06
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Researchers from Northwestern Medicine and Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering have created the world’s smallest wearable, battery-free sensor.

The sensor is designed to measure exposure to light across multiple wavelengths spanning UV to visible light.

It’s able to record up to three separate wavelengths of light at once.

The team says that the underlying physics and extensions of the platform give it a wide array of potential clinical applications.

The device is solar powered and very robust, and said to be “virtually indestructible.” During a study where human participants wore the sensor, the sensor recorded multiple forms of light exposure during outdoor activities, even when the user was in the water.

The sensor was also used to monitor therapeutic UV light in clinical phototherapy booths used to treat psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

collect
0
Jesse Rodriguez 2020-07-27
(Northwestern University) New research by Northwestern Engineering and Georgia Institute of Technology expands the understanding of origami structures, opening possibilities for mechanical metamaterials to be used in soft robotics and medical devices.
collect
0
Troy Schindler 2020-09-04
img

Just not very well

Video  Engineers have overhauled the classic handheld 8-bit Game Boy to include solar panels on the front and an internal electromagnetic coil to generate electrical energy from button presses. Not so much batteries not included as batteries not needed.…

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0
Mattie Wright 2021-02-19
(Northwestern University) Northwestern University synthetic biologists have developed a design-driven process to build complex genetic circuits for cellular engineering. The new technology utilizes computational modeling to more efficiently identify useful genetic designs before building them in the lab. Faced with myriad possibilities, modeling points researchers to designs that offer real opportunity. The researchers constructed a variety of genetic programs to carry out desired and useful functions in human cells and found the programs worked as predicted. And the designs worked the first time.
collect
0
Jason Hill 2019-02-08
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A new method developed by Northwestern Engineering's Manijeh Razeghi has greatly reduced a type of image distortion caused by the presence of spectral cross-talk between dual-band long-wavelength photodetectors.

The work opens the door for a new generation of high spectral-contrast infrared imaging devices with applications in medicine, defense and security, planetary sciences, and art preservation.

"Dual-band photodetectors offer many benefits in infrared imaging, including higher quality images and more available data for image processing algorithms," said Razeghi, Walter P. Murphy Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the McCormick School of Engineering.

"However, performance can be limited by spectral cross-talk interference between the two channels, which leads to poor spectral contrast and prevents infrared camera technology from reaching its true potential."

A paper outlining her work, titled "Suppressing Spectral Crosstalk in Dual-Band Long- Wavelength Infrared Photodetectors with Monolithically Integrated Air-Gapped Distributed Bragg Reflectors," was recently published in the IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics.

The use of dual-band detection in night-vision cameras, for example, can help the wearer better distinguish between moving targets and objects in the background.

collect
0
Jermaine Dusenbery 2021-06-22
(Northwestern University) Researchers from Northwestern Engineering and the University of Messina in Italy have developed a new magnetic memory device based on antiferromagnetic materials that could bolster memory-intensive computing applications, including artificial intelligence and cryptocurrency mining.
collect
0
Jimmy Richmond 2019-04-11
img

"Understanding macromolecular motion is critical, but scientists know very little about it," said Vadim Backman, Walter Dill Scott Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Northwestern University.

Now, a research team at the McCormick School of Engineering led by Backman has developed a new optical technique to study the movement of cells without using labels or dyes to track them.

The innovative method has also revealed an undiscovered phenomenon that may play a role in the earliest stages of cell death.

The paper is titled "Multimodal interference-based imaging of nanoscale structure and macromolecular motion uncovers UV induced cellular paroxysm."

While scientists can currently track the movement of cells using molecular dyes or labels, the practice comes with limitations.

Labels are attached to cells, can be toxic or result in photobleaching, and may alert the motion of the very molecules they label.

collect
0
Frederick Jones 2019-04-18
img

EVANSTON, Ill. -- Antimicrobial paints offer the promise of extra protection against bacteria.

But Northwestern University researchers caution that these paints might be doing more harm than good.

In a new study, the researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints.

Within 24 hours, all bacteria died except for Bacillus timonensis, a spore-forming bacterium.

Most bacilli are commonly inhabit soil, but many are found in indoor environments.

"Bacillus is typically innocuous, but by attacking it, you might prompt it to develop more antibiotic resistance."

collect
0
Angela Skipper 2019-01-25
img

EVANSTON, Ill. --- More than 40 billion capillaries -- tiny, hair-like blood vessels -- are tasked with carrying oxygen and nutrients to the far reaches of the human body.

Now a Northwestern University team has developed a new tool that images blood flow through these tiny vessels, giving insight into this central portion of the human circulatory system.

Called spectral contrast optical coherence tomography angiography (SC-OCTA), the 3D-imaging technique can detect subtle changes in capillary organization for early diagnosis of disease.

"Now we can see even the smallest capillaries and measure blood flow, oxygenation and metabolic rate."

The paper was published last week in the journal Light: Science and Applications.

Backman is the Walter Dill Scott Professor of Biomedical Engineering in Northwestern's McCormick School of Engineering.

collect
0
Leon Bailey 2019-08-15
img

Wrong -- at least when working with "flakes" of graphene oxide (GO).

A new study from Northwestern University researchers shows that better GO "paper" can be made by mixing strong, solid GO flakes with weak, porous GO flakes.

The finding will aid the production of higher quality GO materials, and it sheds light on a general problem in materials engineering: how to build a nano-scale material into a macroscopic material without losing its desirable properties.

"To put it in human terms, collaboration is very important," said Jiaxing Huang, Northwestern Engineering professor of materials science and engineering, who led the study.

"Excellent players can still make a bad team if they don't work well together.

Here, we add some seemingly weaker players and they strengthen the whole team."

collect
0
Kyle Patterson 2020-08-10
img
(Northwestern University) A novel precision medicine approach enhanced by artificial intelligence has laid the groundwork for what could be the first biomedical screening and intervention tool for a subtype of autism, reports a new study. The approach is believed to be the first of its kind. Today, autism is diagnosed based only on symptoms and by the time a physician identifies it, it's often when early and critical brain developmental windows have passed without appropriate intervention. This discovery could shift that paradigm.
collect
0
Jason Hill 2019-03-19
img

A team of researchers including Northwestern Engineering faculty has expanded the understanding of how virus shells self-assemble, an important step toward developing techniques that use viruses as vehicles to deliver targeted drugs and therapeutics throughout the body.

By performing multiple amino acid substitutions, the researchers discovered instances of epistasis, a phenomenon in which two changes produce a behavior different from the behavior that each change causes individually.

"We found occurrences where two separate single amino acid changes caused the virus shell to break or become really unstable, but making both changes together produced a stable structure that functioned better than ever," said Danielle Tullman-Ercek, associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at the McCormick School of Engineering.

The paper titled "Experimental Evaluation of Coevolution in a Self-Assembling Particle," was published the March 19 print issue of Biochemistry.

Tullman-Ercek served as the paper's co-corresponding author along with collaborator Matthew Francis, professor of chemistry at the University of California at Berkeley.

The work builds on past research in which Tullman-Ercek and collaborators developed a new technique, called SyMAPS (Systematic Mutation and Assembled Particle Selection), to test variations of a protein used by a bacterial virus called the MS2 bacteriophage.

collect
0
Eric Calvillo 2021-06-25
img
(Northwestern University) Researchers have discovered that, in an attempt to adapt to impairments from stroke, muscles lose sarcomeres -- their smallest, most basic building blocks. The team hopes this discovery can help improve rehabilitation techniques to rebuild sarcomeres, ultimately helping to ease muscle tightening and shortening.
James Honor 2020-09-18
img
(Northwestern University) Professor James Rondinelli's new design criteria for enhancing the spin lifetime of a class of quantum materials could support Internet of Things devices and other resource-intensive technologies.
Donald Herrera 2018-12-06
img

Researchers from Northwestern Medicine and Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering have created the world’s smallest wearable, battery-free sensor.

The sensor is designed to measure exposure to light across multiple wavelengths spanning UV to visible light.

It’s able to record up to three separate wavelengths of light at once.

The team says that the underlying physics and extensions of the platform give it a wide array of potential clinical applications.

The device is solar powered and very robust, and said to be “virtually indestructible.” During a study where human participants wore the sensor, the sensor recorded multiple forms of light exposure during outdoor activities, even when the user was in the water.

The sensor was also used to monitor therapeutic UV light in clinical phototherapy booths used to treat psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

Troy Schindler 2020-09-04
img

Just not very well

Video  Engineers have overhauled the classic handheld 8-bit Game Boy to include solar panels on the front and an internal electromagnetic coil to generate electrical energy from button presses. Not so much batteries not included as batteries not needed.…

Jason Hill 2019-02-08
img

A new method developed by Northwestern Engineering's Manijeh Razeghi has greatly reduced a type of image distortion caused by the presence of spectral cross-talk between dual-band long-wavelength photodetectors.

The work opens the door for a new generation of high spectral-contrast infrared imaging devices with applications in medicine, defense and security, planetary sciences, and art preservation.

"Dual-band photodetectors offer many benefits in infrared imaging, including higher quality images and more available data for image processing algorithms," said Razeghi, Walter P. Murphy Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the McCormick School of Engineering.

"However, performance can be limited by spectral cross-talk interference between the two channels, which leads to poor spectral contrast and prevents infrared camera technology from reaching its true potential."

A paper outlining her work, titled "Suppressing Spectral Crosstalk in Dual-Band Long- Wavelength Infrared Photodetectors with Monolithically Integrated Air-Gapped Distributed Bragg Reflectors," was recently published in the IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics.

The use of dual-band detection in night-vision cameras, for example, can help the wearer better distinguish between moving targets and objects in the background.

Jimmy Richmond 2019-04-11
img

"Understanding macromolecular motion is critical, but scientists know very little about it," said Vadim Backman, Walter Dill Scott Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Northwestern University.

Now, a research team at the McCormick School of Engineering led by Backman has developed a new optical technique to study the movement of cells without using labels or dyes to track them.

The innovative method has also revealed an undiscovered phenomenon that may play a role in the earliest stages of cell death.

The paper is titled "Multimodal interference-based imaging of nanoscale structure and macromolecular motion uncovers UV induced cellular paroxysm."

While scientists can currently track the movement of cells using molecular dyes or labels, the practice comes with limitations.

Labels are attached to cells, can be toxic or result in photobleaching, and may alert the motion of the very molecules they label.

Angela Skipper 2019-01-25
img

EVANSTON, Ill. --- More than 40 billion capillaries -- tiny, hair-like blood vessels -- are tasked with carrying oxygen and nutrients to the far reaches of the human body.

Now a Northwestern University team has developed a new tool that images blood flow through these tiny vessels, giving insight into this central portion of the human circulatory system.

Called spectral contrast optical coherence tomography angiography (SC-OCTA), the 3D-imaging technique can detect subtle changes in capillary organization for early diagnosis of disease.

"Now we can see even the smallest capillaries and measure blood flow, oxygenation and metabolic rate."

The paper was published last week in the journal Light: Science and Applications.

Backman is the Walter Dill Scott Professor of Biomedical Engineering in Northwestern's McCormick School of Engineering.

Kyle Patterson 2020-08-10
img
(Northwestern University) A novel precision medicine approach enhanced by artificial intelligence has laid the groundwork for what could be the first biomedical screening and intervention tool for a subtype of autism, reports a new study. The approach is believed to be the first of its kind. Today, autism is diagnosed based only on symptoms and by the time a physician identifies it, it's often when early and critical brain developmental windows have passed without appropriate intervention. This discovery could shift that paradigm.
William Franklin 2021-03-22
img
(Northwestern University) A Northwestern research team including Professors Justin Notestein and Peter Stair has demonstrated a new approach to chemical catalysis that results in higher yields of propylene -- the basis for many plastics -- using less energy.
Manuel Scarborough 2021-07-21
img
(Northwestern University) The method from a research team led by Professor Horacio Espinosa could lead to more accurate predictions of how new materials behave at the atomic scale.
Jesse Rodriguez 2020-07-27
(Northwestern University) New research by Northwestern Engineering and Georgia Institute of Technology expands the understanding of origami structures, opening possibilities for mechanical metamaterials to be used in soft robotics and medical devices.
Mattie Wright 2021-02-19
(Northwestern University) Northwestern University synthetic biologists have developed a design-driven process to build complex genetic circuits for cellular engineering. The new technology utilizes computational modeling to more efficiently identify useful genetic designs before building them in the lab. Faced with myriad possibilities, modeling points researchers to designs that offer real opportunity. The researchers constructed a variety of genetic programs to carry out desired and useful functions in human cells and found the programs worked as predicted. And the designs worked the first time.
Jermaine Dusenbery 2021-06-22
(Northwestern University) Researchers from Northwestern Engineering and the University of Messina in Italy have developed a new magnetic memory device based on antiferromagnetic materials that could bolster memory-intensive computing applications, including artificial intelligence and cryptocurrency mining.
Frederick Jones 2019-04-18
img

EVANSTON, Ill. -- Antimicrobial paints offer the promise of extra protection against bacteria.

But Northwestern University researchers caution that these paints might be doing more harm than good.

In a new study, the researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints.

Within 24 hours, all bacteria died except for Bacillus timonensis, a spore-forming bacterium.

Most bacilli are commonly inhabit soil, but many are found in indoor environments.

"Bacillus is typically innocuous, but by attacking it, you might prompt it to develop more antibiotic resistance."

Leon Bailey 2019-08-15
img

Wrong -- at least when working with "flakes" of graphene oxide (GO).

A new study from Northwestern University researchers shows that better GO "paper" can be made by mixing strong, solid GO flakes with weak, porous GO flakes.

The finding will aid the production of higher quality GO materials, and it sheds light on a general problem in materials engineering: how to build a nano-scale material into a macroscopic material without losing its desirable properties.

"To put it in human terms, collaboration is very important," said Jiaxing Huang, Northwestern Engineering professor of materials science and engineering, who led the study.

"Excellent players can still make a bad team if they don't work well together.

Here, we add some seemingly weaker players and they strengthen the whole team."

Jason Hill 2019-03-19
img

A team of researchers including Northwestern Engineering faculty has expanded the understanding of how virus shells self-assemble, an important step toward developing techniques that use viruses as vehicles to deliver targeted drugs and therapeutics throughout the body.

By performing multiple amino acid substitutions, the researchers discovered instances of epistasis, a phenomenon in which two changes produce a behavior different from the behavior that each change causes individually.

"We found occurrences where two separate single amino acid changes caused the virus shell to break or become really unstable, but making both changes together produced a stable structure that functioned better than ever," said Danielle Tullman-Ercek, associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at the McCormick School of Engineering.

The paper titled "Experimental Evaluation of Coevolution in a Self-Assembling Particle," was published the March 19 print issue of Biochemistry.

Tullman-Ercek served as the paper's co-corresponding author along with collaborator Matthew Francis, professor of chemistry at the University of California at Berkeley.

The work builds on past research in which Tullman-Ercek and collaborators developed a new technique, called SyMAPS (Systematic Mutation and Assembled Particle Selection), to test variations of a protein used by a bacterial virus called the MS2 bacteriophage.